• Memory Lane Cruisers car show to honor HOPE

    The time has changed, spring is springing, and the old cars are starting to come out of their winter homes.
    Memory Lane Cruisers of Lancaster is one of the oldest car clubs around. We were established in 1998 and we are still going strong. Memory Lane Cruisers was begun to promote an interest in classic cars to keep their memory alive.
    Memory Lane also wants to introduce new generations to the beauty of older cars, when you could actually tell the type of car just by looking at it.

  • Smoking ordinance has positive impact

    Members of the Lancaster County Health & Wellness Commission feel the response to the implementation of the county smoking ordinance has been overwhelmingly positive.
    Several restaurants changed to smoke-free at the beginning of this year or prior to the March 1 compliance date.
    The process of developing and implementing the county smoking ordinance has taken more than four years.
    The U.S. Surgeon General’s 2010 report verified that there is no safe level of exposure to tobacco smoke.

  • Family appreciates Valvoline employees

    On Thursday, March 14, 2013,  we celebrated the life of our grandmother who was affectionately known by many as “Mrs. Polly.” On our way to the cemetery after the service we were riding by Valvoline Express on U.S. 521 and noticed the kind employees. They stood at the front of the business, put their hats on the ground and bowed their heads in respect of the family.
    We were so appreciative of their upmost respect they had for complete strangers. They are a perfect example of how we should be.

  • Writer: Why attack a company that is hiring

    I read Jane Tanners letter. “Red Ventures located in Indian Land, not Fort Mill,” in the March 15 edition of The Lancaster News, and I’m still trying to figure out her gripe. Who cares where they say they are? The company uses a Fort Mill mailing address because I would guess there is no post office in Indian Land to get the large quantity of business mail it receives. I Googled post offices in Indian Land and the Fort Mill Post Office came up.

  • Writer seeks effort to stop child abuse

    Child-abuse cases are rising everyday in our county and the United States. According to National Child Abuse Statistics www.childhelp.org/pages/statistics, five children die each day due to abuse-related deaths.
    It’s time for us to take a stand against child abuse and make a difference in our community. April is Prevent Child Abuse Awareness Month and we would like for you to join us in our effort to stop child abuse from 4-5:30 p.m. April 2 and April 9 at the Lancaster County Library Meeting Room.

  • Whittlesey’s gun control column ‘inane filler’

    If anyone were to judge our area based solely on the submissions of Franklin Whittlesey Sr. that have been printed in The Lancaster News and the Carolina Gateway, they might be inclined to think Lancaster County doesn’t have two brain cells to rub together.   

  • California student seeks info on South Carolina

    My name is Gianna Graffigna. I am a fifth-grader at Napa Valley Language Academy in Napa, Calif.
    My class is doing state reports and I have chosen your awesome state of South Carolina. I would really appreciate if anyone would send me pamphlets, post cards, souvenirs or anything else about South Carolina.
    I will be writing about South Carolina’s agriculture, history, economy, famous people, events, historical figures and national parks. Also, I will be doing an oral report poster and a PowerPoint presentation.

  • It’s time to make B3 zoning changes

    The need for B3 zoning revision in Indian Land is well established. The concern of established landowners that the owner of an adjacent property zoned B3 will suddenly decide to switch to a different, less desirable, but still allowed under current law use is real and immediate.
    The column previously published here detailed changes to the B3 zoning classification in Indian Land that would remove most of this threat.
    In summary:

  • Show respect by pulling over in funeral procession

    I have noticed recently while watching a few funerals that a lot of people don’t pull over while the procession passes. Also, there is only a police car leading the funeral. There are none at intersections to block traffic.
    This is the South and we have always shown respect for the deceased. I think everyone should, at least, take a few minutes from their busy day to pull over and show respect for the deceased.
    There should be an officer at each intersection, so the funeral procession doesn’t have to stop and be held up in traffic.

  • Don’t forget to visit senior citizens

    I recently witnessed something that made me aware of  how important it is to visit our senior citizens when they are sick at home or in a hospital.
    I encourage everyone to go by and check on them, especially church members. As church members, we should go to church and worship and then go out and serve our fellow man.
    Please, let’s not lose sight of what Jesus wants us to do – be Christ-like.

    Christine M. Taylor