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Letters

  • Writer urges SCDOT to fix Taxahaw Road

    Since my first letter about the horrible shape of Taxahaw Road two years ago the S.C. Department of Transportation has done pretty much nothing concerning what I believe to be – not only an exercise in defensive driving but a hazard as well.
    Is there no money to fix this? I read, just like I’m sure a lot of you did, that the portion of this road from Potter Road to S.C. 522 is in the process of being repaved. To that I say, “bravo.” That leads to me also saying, “what about the rest?” These two points cover about 3.5 miles.

  • Atheists don’t have right to shut out God

    I recently read that the name Jesus Christ cannot be invoked in prayer in government offices and other public places in parts of North Carolina.
    Atheists are getting their way again. Those of us, who are Christians, should fight atheists on this issue. We, too, have rights.
    If you are an atheist and don’t believe in God, then don’t invoke his name. But those of us, who are Christians, will.

    Carl M. Miles
    Lancaster

  • Pray for Egypt

    Editor’s note: Chester resident Bill Floyd is a business owner, who travels a lot. Several years ago Floyd wrote a series of stories about the time he spent in Egypt for the Chester News & Reporter, a sister paper to The Lancaster News. Floyd made many friends while there and has kept in contact with them. Following are letters from one of his friends on what it’s like now in Egypt.

  • Hirtle ‘hero’ to stranded driver and passengers

    There are so many negative thinking individuals of our town who fail to recognize the Lancaster Police Department for the fine job their staff and officers are doing protecting us all.

  • Messing with Santa Train off-the-wall no-brainer

    You know when folks in city or county government get to thinking, they sure come up with some harebrained ideas. Messing with the children’s Santa Train (“Council considers changes to Santa Train” in the Aug. 16 edition of The Lancaster News) is one of the latest off-the-wall no-brainers.
    Gosh, kids want to ride the good ole L&C, not shop in downtown Lancaster, visit the Native American Center and buy some wigs from local merchants.
    I guess the next idea is to offer beer sales, too.

    W.B. Evans
    Lancaster

  • We must continue effort to save animals

    There’s an old expression of “you can’t have too much of a good thing.” I’m here to prove otherwise. Saturday, Aug. 17, was National Homeless Animals Day.
    This worldwide event pays tribute to the more than 4 million animals destroyed in our nation’s shelters each year.
    Although the number of animals killed annually has dropped dramatically over the past 23 years, statistics show that a shelter animal is killed every six seconds.

  • Do smokers’ rights trump nonsmokers’ rights?

    The Aug. 14, 2013, letter to the editor “New York, nor county has the right to tell us how to live” has an interesting Libertarian position and certainly valid.
    The author’s challenge to provide an example of where anyone is forced to breathe second-hand smoke is equally valid.
    Put in a situation where someone is smoking, the nonsmoker can leave or stop breathing.

  • Notice to Lancaster County taxpayers

    Tax notices for 2013 are being prepared to be mailed next month. Owners of real estate, personal property and businesses will receive their bills and they are due by Jan. 15, 2014, without penalties.
    A major change is in effect as of July 26, 2013, with the S.C. Department of Revenue.
    The counties no longer have access to the DOR system, due to the data breech the state experienced this past spring.
    Therefore, we will no longer be able to make changes in the office, as we have in the past.

  • Organization seeks info on WWII women workers

    American Rosie the Riveter Association is trying to locate women in Lancaster and the surrounding area, who worked on the home front during World War II.
    Thousands of women worked to support the war effort as riveters, welders, electricians, inspectors in plants, sewing clothing and parachutes for the military, ordnance workers, rolling bandages, clerical and many other jobs, such as volunteer workers collecting scrap metals and other critical materials.

  • Historic church restoration tedious, painstaking project

    Ever wondered why it takes so long and seems to cost so much to restore an historic building? Well, Conner Tindal can give you a few answers. Tindal has been working, going on three years, to repair masonry and plaster at the Cultural Arts Center.
    Although there’s plenty to be done, his primary focus is repairing structural cracks and sealing cracks that could work their way through to the outside, wasting energy to heat and cool, and allowing entry to unwanted visitors like bats and insects. In the process, his work is also improving the look of the building.