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Letters

  • Despite closing of Network, literacy lives on

    The Carolinas Literacy Network closed its doors on April 25.

    For eight years, with the mission of giving people the skills to become life-long learners, CLN has provided training, equipment, materials, technical support, administrative support and marketing support to our member agencies, all with the goal of increasing literacy and engaging our community.

    Carolinas Literacy Network began as the Lancaster Area Literacy Cooperative in 2006, created by the J. Marion Sims Foundation.

  • Tragedies bring out true American character

    South Carolina is nearly a thousand miles from Boston, Mass. But we, too, were shaken by the events of April 15, 2013.

    Two homemade bombs exploded in the midst of the Boston Marathon, killing three spectators, shattering the lives of dozens of others, and casting a pall of sadness over one of America’s proud traditions.

  • Would gas increase be used for road repairs?

    Thanks to Lancaster County District 1 Councilman Brian Carnes for his documentary on roads which appeared in the April 20 edition of The Lancaster News.

    I sorta chuckled when he mentioned that County Council ain’t responsible for dealing with road stuff.

    Seems it all comes back to South Carolina’s  low tax levy on gasoline.

  • Free tutoring, regardless of age or income

    The educational process can be very demanding. If a student misses a key concept in any course, the ability to catch up is difficult, sometimes impossible.

    This is especially true for mathematics. Students may be ashamed or embarrassed to ask for help. Finding the appropriate tutor may be difficult and too expensive for many families.

  • Important to know full story of Democrats, Republicans

    Phil Noble’s article, “A scorned S.C. hero,” on April 18, is an article with a lot of information missing. This scorned hero, federal Judge Julius Waites Waring, he wrote about was a longtime Democrat, who actually became a Republican in his ideology and actions.

  • For a maze challenge, travel Riverside

    If you enjoy driving in a maze, then you need to travel Riverside Road from Meeting Street to S.C. 5. It’s a true challenge, and you’ll be lucky if your car is still in one piece.

    B.L Bailey

    Lancaster

  • Do your part on Earth Day

    On April 22, we will have the 44th anniversary of Earth Day. This was started by people as a way to call attention to environmental pollution the country was then experiencing.

    So in the past 44 years, how have we done as a nation? As a former EPA administrator has said, “All of our rivers and lakes may not be fishable and swimmable, but they are no longer flammable.”

  • No reason for continuing shooting rampages

    There are no excuses for the continued rampage on the Fort Hood Army Base.

    Officials make feeble explanations as to why a soldier breaks down from the stresses of war.

    The reason is in Washington. We still have a bunch of old war hawks and a military industrial complex who love to send others into battles to enrich their own bank accounts.

    Our generals should be engaged in battle plans not the bedrooms of female admirers.

  • First Steps celebrates Week of the Young Child

    Young children in Lancaster County deserve the best that we can give them.

    The Week of the Young Child, April 6-12, is a time to recognize the needs of young children, and thank the adults involved in their education and care.

    Parents, teachers, caregivers and other adults play important roles in the lives of young children, and the Week of the Young Child celebrates their efforts.

  • Advice for South Carolina: Promise more, deliver more

    This is a response to S.C. Comptroller General Richard Eckstrom’s opinion article, “Advice for White House: Promise less, deliver more,” in the April 4 edition of The Lancaster News.

    Are you one of those bureaucrats who promotes less government? You complain in your article, but offer no solutions. You and your governor turn down federal school money and Medicaid expansion.