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Columns

  • Carnes explains road funding

    This column was supposed to be dedicated to talking about the county budget process, but with the weather we had in February causing additional road problems, I would like to dedicate this column and my next column to talking about roads.

    There have been several letters to the editor about the increased potholes and road issues following the winter storms we have experienced.

  • A scorned S.C. hero

    April 11, 2014, was a very important day in the history of South Carolina. Few people noticed that anything much happened – but I would argue that this was the day we, as a state, did two very important things.

    First, we recognized a hero. And second, we showed that there is a new South Carolina that is – and for some time has been– struggling to be born.

  • USDA seeks local sponsors for free summer lunch program

    As a child, I always looked forward to the carefree joy of summertime. I remember the long days of playing outside at a nearby park until I needed to come home for lunch. 

    Unfortunately, many of our nation’s children do not experience the simple joys of summer. In fact, far too many are left worrying where their next breakfast or lunch will come from when schools are dismissed for summer break.

  • Six trials of Christ

    The Bible records six trials of Jesus before his crucifixion. The first three were before Jewish religious authorities, and the last three were before Roman authorities.

    After his betrayal, Jesus was led away to Annas, a former high priest. Annas questioned Jesus about his disciples and his teaching, and allowed a nearby temple officer to strike Jesus in the face.

  • More housing = more traffic

    I couldn’t agree more with what Jane Tanner wrote in her April 2 guest column, “IL growth boom worrisome.” I think we have a lot to be nervous about with all the new homes being built in town.

    The total number of units Ms. Tanner listed in her column adds up to 2,428. If each of those homes brings two vehicles to the area, we’re looking at almost 5,000 more cars on our already crowded roads in the next year or two.

  • Instilling patriotism in today’s youth

    It’s often noted that today’s young people don’t have a strong sense of patriotism like their parents and grandparents did.

    Young people still love America and understand the importance of serving a cause greater than themselves. But it’s hard to ignore the fact that love of country and patriotic values aren’t instilled in young people today the way they were years ago.

  • Will S.C. miss the future?

    You may not know the name, but we in South Carolina need to listen to Larry Page. He is a very bright and very rich young man.

    A few years ago, he and his college roommate, Sergey Brin, started a little company with a funny name that has done right well. It’s called Google.

    In a recent interview, Page was asked about what makes companies grow and thrive or shrink and die. His response was simple. “Do they miss the future or do they get it?” he asked.

  • Definition of Obamacare success is puzzling

    President Barack Obama was celebrating the 7 million enrollees in Obamacare the other day with a speech in the Rose Garden. Here are a few excerpts from that speech that had me scratching my head.

    “This law is doing what it’s supposed to do! It’s working, it’s helping people coast to coast.

  • Remove Obamacare burden from Americans

    At this point, it’s already clear that Obamacare is doing far more harm than good. We’ve all become familiar with the soaring premiums, lost coverage and dismal sign-up numbers. 

    Families and young people are routinely being priced out of the market, hourly workers are seeing their workweeks slashed and individuals are losing access to their doctors.

  • Is Public Service Commission secretly approving rate hikes?

    From May 2005 through Oct. 30, 2013, the S.C. Public Service Commission (PSC) raised the average electric bill for SCE&G residential customers 21 times.

    From October 2005 through Jan. 1, the average bill for Duke Energy Carolinas residential customers using the same amount of electricity (1,000 kilowatt hours per month) was raised 14 times, The Nerve found in a review of rates published by the state Office of Regulatory Staff.