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Columns

  • Open government promoted on Madison’s birthday

    I was recently honored by the S.C. State Library for my work in creating the state’s transparency website. It was part of an awards ceremony recognizing individuals and government agencies that advance the cause of open government.
     The ceremony was held on March 16, which was quite fitting. For one thing, March 16 is the birthday of James Madison, one of our nation’s earliest advocates of government transparency.

  • Community has opportunity to honor veterans of all wars

    Editor’s note: Veterans Remembered is the second in a series written in support of the Veterans Monument being built for all veterans of Lancaster County in hopes it will stimulate readers to remember those veterans who touched their lives and provide support for the Veterans
    Monument Project.
    The response received from Veterans Remembered has been tremendous. A gratitude of thanks to each of you who responded and to the news media for its part in agreeing to follow the project to completion.

  • Council Chairwoman Sistare responds to Tindal’s column

    In his March 9 guest column, “Emperor has no clothes,” Will Tindal made some observations and drew some conclusions based upon a report presented to Lancaster County Council at our recent strategic planning session.

  • Stand with us for transparency, accountability in government

    Editor’s note: South Carolina and the nation mark Sunshine Week, March 13-19. Gov. Nikki Haley offers this commentary about the importance of open government.

    In the latter part of Margaret Thatcher’s tenure as prime minister of Great Britain, she said, “No government can do anything except through people, and people must look to themselves first.”

  • South Carolina taxpayers need to see how government spends its money

    It was three years ago this month that I unveiled the state’s first transparency website, giving taxpayers a central site to view itemized expenditures for state agencies. The idea was simple: People work hard for their money, and they deserve easy, click-of-a-mouse access to details about how government uses their tax dollars.

  • Outreach Project director thanks community for support

    On behalf of the Lancaster County Outreach Project and Lancaster County Partners for Youth, I’d like to thank the community so much for whole-heartedly embracing the Outreach Project since it started two years ago.
    The Outreach Project exists to enhance the lives of abused and neglected children in our county, who are in foster care or under the supervision of the Department of Social Services in Lancaster County.

  • Mound of garbage won’t improve our economy

    There has been much written concerning Griffin Brothers Enterprises and its proposal for a solid waste landfill on the site on Mineral Mining Road where they already have an industrial landfill.
    One of their proposed enticements to Lancaster County officials was the olive branch of a $20 million investment and the promise of creating 15-20 permanent jobs for Lancaster residents at minimum wages mostly.
    Imagine, Lancaster residents being the proud owners of $20 million worth of household garbage and lots of that hauled in from North Carolina.

  • Mulvaney explains what government shutdown means

    There’s been a lot of talk recently in political circles about a possible “government shutdown.” I thought it would be a good idea to explain what is really going on, why we are even discussing a shutdown and what that means for you.
    What a government shutdown is and is not:

  • Emperor has no clothes

    Lancaster County Deputy Administrator Jeff Naftal recently issued his Report on Economic Development Policies to Lancaster County Council. The report is quite revealing, eye-opening and should give all taxpayers of Lancaster County great concern.
    The report makes many points, some of which follow:
    1. County Council’s goal is bringing jobs to Lancaster County residents.
    2. Many of the companies coming to Lancaster are moving across the state line.
    3. Most of the companies kept their existing staff, adding few, if any employees.

  • Dangerous dog laws designed to protect dogs, not victims

    The recent dog bite tragedy in Waxhaw, where little Makayla Woodard lost her life and her grandmother suffered injuries trying to protect her grandchild struck a nerve in my heart and brought tears to my eyes. 
    It just so happened that our 5-year old son, Tanner Landires, was attacked by the neighbor’s dogs in the Arlington community last July.