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Columns

  • Long explains Amazon vote

    Long explains Amazon vote

    Last week’s Amazon decision was the single most difficult vote I have taken as a legislator. In the end, putting people to work and food on their table is an immediate need and requires immediate attention. However, it does not fix the longer, real job creation act of tax reform. 

    Amazon means jobs

  • Column: Stegall’s sense of duty lives on

    They left the comfort of their surroundings and went to strange places where they were called upon to do things unnatural to civilized humanity. Some are buried in foreign lands. Some are buried at sea. The status of some is unknown. There is a story for each of the many thousands who went away to war. I offer this one.
    In 1966, a young man named Lindell Ray “Butch” Stegall was relentless in requests to his parents that they sign a waiver so he might enlist in the U.S. Marine Corps. He was only 17.

  • Harley Dokota Manus, 13

    LANCASTER – Mr. Harley Dokota Manus, age 13, of 1100 West Shore Drive, died May 24, 2011, at his home.
    He was born March 2, 1998, in Rock Hill, the son of Darryl Manus and Donna Catoe Manus. Harley was a seventh-grade student at A.R. Rucker Middle School, loved fishing, his computer, spending time with his family and friends and was of the Baptist faith.     

  • Column: New GOP leadership lights fires

    I often wonder what happened to my once-quiet, retired life on Red Rose Ranch, but I do not regret my decision to run for chairwoman of the Lancaster County Republican Party.
    It has been almost two months since our county reorganization, where we elect officers for our party. I am excited to introduce our very energetic team: I am the chairwoman; Donnie Jones, executive committeeman; Kevin Moughan, vice chair; Roger Summey, second vice chair; Brian Carnes, secretary and John Plyler, treasurer.

  • Veterans Remembered: Recalling our Vietnam vets

    Veterans Remembered is the seventh in a series written in support of the Veterans Monument being built for the veterans of Lancaster County in hopes it will stimulate readers to remember those veterans who touched their lives and provide support of the Veterans Monument project.
    This Veterans Remembered will tell you just a little about several local veterans who were killed while serving their country in Vietnam.

  • Column: Graduation a time for optimism

    It seems you can’t open a newspaper or turn on the television these days without being clobbered with “bad news” – news about tragic natural disasters, sky-rocketing gas prices, national unemployment rates that continue to climb and political strife in Washington. It’s an unfortunate fact that positive things are overlooked too often.

  • Column: Courthouse grand opening should have been open to all

    As I was driving down Main Street on Thursday (May 12) afternoon, I was marveling at the beautiful new courthouse we, the people of Lancaster County, are having built. It is truly a sight, compared to our previous courthouse, but as I looked at the building and its surroundings, something suddenly drew my attention.

  • Veterans Remembered column: World War II vet molded Heath Springs Class of ’64

    Veterans Remembered is the sixth in a series written in support of the Veterans Monument being built for the veterans of Lancaster County in hopes it will stimulate readers to remember those veterans who touched their lives and provide support of the Veterans Monument project.

  • Column: Anniversary tribute to a long-gone friend

    May 11, 2011, marked the 15th anniversary of the tragic loss of a great friend, John Patrick Barnhart Jr. of Indian Land.
    A tribute I wrote about him was published days after his life was swept away, at age 19, by the deceiving current where he and other friends were swimming in the Catawba River under the Highway 5 bridge near Bowater. It was May 11, 1996 – Mother’s Day and the birthday of his sister, Christina B. Rogers, and another friend, Billy Bennett Jr.

  • Column: Reporter finds news of bin Laden saga intriguing

    The TV was on, my laptop computer was running and my cell phone was receiving dozens of text messages by the hour. These forms of communication, along with a few others, have been employed heavily in recent days as I’ve immersed myself in the news coverage of Osama bin Laden’s death.
    I was at home surfing the Internet the night of May 1 when a few Facebook friends said President Barack Obama would soon be addressing the nation regarding a “national-security issue.”