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Columns

  • Our county GOP is getting involved with more local events

    It’s great to let you all know what has been happening in the world of the Lancaster County Republican Party.
    I don’t believe we have stopped since we started. I know the virtual world is full of the latest and greatest information, but many of you do not have that access.
    So, if you see any of us on the street, come up to us and chat for a minute. We would be more than happy to fill you in.

  • Old Lancaster courthouse is an historical treasure

    Nov. 4, 1828, (183 years ago) must have been a big day in the little upcountry town of Lancasterville. On that day, Stephen Decatur Miller headed a state delegation to inspect the new Lancasterville Courthouse.
    One month later, Miller, who was born in the Waxhaws of Lancaster County, would be elected the new governor of South Carolina.

  • Purpose of courthouse is to administer justice

    Editor’s note: The following is speech given by Robert Folks, president of the Lancaster County Bar Association at the dedication of the new Lancaster County Courthouse on May 12.
    My name is Robert Folks and it is my honor to serve as president of the Lancaster County Bar Association at the time of this momentous occasion.
    I am reminded today of comments made by my fellow attorney, Mitch Norrell, at the groundbreaking for this facility not so many months ago. He served then as president of the local bar as I am today.

  • Financial meeting a positive step for South Carolina

    On June 14, Gov. Nikki Haley hosted a meeting between state government’s financial leaders and representatives of Standard and Poor’s, one of the nation’s most highly-respected credit rating agencies.

  • Knight has witnessed the Main Street transformation

    Hazel Knight recalls Main Street, Lancaster, as it was more than 60 years ago. Knight was 11 years old in 1943 when he went to work for James and Etta Robinson in their clothing store. He swept and mopped the wooden floors and dusted the counters and shelves and ran errands.

  • Million Pound Challenge kickoff is tomorrow at Kmart

    Deborah Boulware

    Come to the Million Pound Challenge Kickoff this Saturday at Kmart and you’ll see me there – here’s why.

     Four Months earlier 

    I’m at a seminar just to support an agency that I truly believe in, when the nurse hands everyone a paper with a graph-looking thing. Then she says, “Step on the scale so we can calculate your BMI (Body Mass Index).”

    My first thought: “No way. I’m just here to listen.” In fact, I even say that to the nurse.

  • Chandler’s Law is big government at its best

    Recently, the S.C. Legislature passed and Gov. Nikki Haley signed Chandler’s Law. The law, which was named after Chandler Saylor, is meant to keep children safe while riding all-terrain vehicles (ATVs.) However, I believe this law ultimately strips parents of their right to raise their child.

  • Are we headed for nuclear abyss or human survival?

    Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and his quest for Iran to get nuclear weapons remains a news worthy item. What does that mean for America and Israel? It can only come down to one thing – eventual war.
    Since the recent collapse of the Egyptian government, radical Islam on both ends now controls the Suez Canal. Iranian warships are passing through the canal into the Mediterranean Sea next to Israel’s coast.
    Egypt, now under military control, is permanently opened to the Gaza Strip. This is a major security breach with Israel.

  • Partisanship not a behavioral issue – it is a structural one

    Pew Research Center released a survey last month which was encouragingly called “Beyond Red vs. Blue.”  Encouraging, that is, for the growing number of Americans eager to find a way out of the partisanship that has come to dominate public policy-making at nearly every level of government.

  • What it takes to be a citizen

    A few weeks ago, the federally run National Assessment of Educational Progress issued its latest “report card” on civics education in the United States. You get a sense of what it found from “The New York Times” headline: “Civics Education Called National Crisis.”
    Most media coverage of the report focused on students’ precarious knowledge of our system of government.