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Columns

  • County purchases should have caused public outcry

    I am thrilled, but yet somewhat appalled at the outrage of the citizens of Lancaster County for being so humiliated by CNN’s coverage. Lancaster County taxpayers should have shown these same emotions and outcry last year when Lancaster County Council purchased the building site for the new EMS station in the Buford community.
    Council formed a committee combining the talents of three of our fine councilmen – Cotton Cole, Jack Estridge and Larry Honeycutt – to locate a site and return with recommendations.

  • Uncontrolled target shooting in residential areas dangerous

    Editor’s note: Indian Land resident Colin Wilson sent this letter to the members of Lancaster County Council regarding target shooting in residential areas.
    Ihave read that you are considering an ordinance concerning residents shooting on their private property.
    I am a resident of Indian Land, a longtime National Rifle Associaion member, an avid skeet, trap, rifle and pistol shooter, as is my wife. We live on McFalls Drive off Carolina Acres Road in Indian Land. More than half of our neighbors are NRA members, hunters and shooters.

  • To be fair, Lancaster deserves its respect

    Fairness is one of the first lessons you learn in reporting. Give both sides.
    The recent CNN story about Lancaster, on the heels of the S.C. Republican Primary Jan. 21, wasn’t a true reflection of our town.

  • Open letter to Lancaster County Chamber leader

    Beve Lynch
    Dear Mr. Dean Faile,
    I don’t understand why the Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce is so upset. The CNN reporter simply wrote what she was told in interviews with citizens of Lancaster County. That is what reporters do.
    If the chamber is upset with anyone, perhaps you should speak to those who gave offensive interviews or put Lancaster County in a bad light, as you see it.

  • CNN: So glad for your visit, bless your heart

    Dear CNN,
    Unlike some folks in Lancaster County, I want to say thank you for coming here recently to put us in the national spotlight and point out all our problems. It’s about time somebody shed a little light on things around here. I owe you a great debt.

  • What I like about Lancaster County

    Collaboration. I like the sense of collaboration with the governmental and nonprofit organizations, including the school district.
    Together, we address the challenges that our county has and work hard to find solutions.
    We work as a team. In many communities agencies operate in silos, not realizing what others are doing.

    Sharon Novinger
    Executive director
    Lancaster County Partners for Youth

  • Nieces adored Uncle Jerry

    Editor’s note: Lancaster resident Cami Steen’s first grandchild was born Jan. 11, 2012. While waiting the arrival of Braelyn Emanuel Mickle, Steen recalled an incident from her childhood when she and her two sisters stayed with grandparents in Durham, N.C., when their fourth sister was about to enter the world. It was Jerry Honeycutt, their beloved uncle, who drove the three young siblings to Durham. Steen wrote this article about her favorite uncle when she was a student at the University of South Carolina Lancaster.

  • Community rallies to support children

    On behalf of the Lancaster County Outreach Project, I would like to thank the community for your outpouring of support to the children of our county during the holiday season.
    The Outreach Project exists to enhance the lives of abused and neglected children who are in foster care or who are under the supervision of the Lancaster County Department of Social Services.

  • Community newspapers strengthen hometowns

    In Pickens County, the local Meals on Wheels program announced in early January that it’s teaming up with another organization to prepare emergency food packages for homebound people in case inclement weather creates hazardous driving conditions, which prevent Meals on Wheels volunteers from being able to deliver food, according to the Pickens Sentinel.

  • Climate change costs you

    What do cars, computer hard drives, hamburgers, chocolate, coffee, peanut butter, wine cotton tee shirts and Kentucky bourbon have in common? They’re all likely to cost more in coming months and years for the same reason: climate change.
    Globalization has brought us many wonderful things, like cheap jeans and bananas in February. But lately, the global economy is taking a hit from global warming, as extreme weather increases the price and decreases availability of United States imports and domestic goods.