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Columns

  • Column: As proms begin, let’s be vigilant on DUI and drinking parties

    In 2001, the Lancaster County Coalition for Healthy Youth was formed and is now led by a network of over 40 local public, private, civic and faith-based organizations.
    Over that time, the coalition has worked to raise awareness and address a wide range of problem youth behaviors such as substance abuse, delinquency, teen pregnancy and gang affiliation.  
    One project sponsored by the coalition, “Take ‘U’ out of DUI,” addresses two important community problems: driving under the influence of alcohol and underage drinking.

  • Column: Keeping the conversation going about race, policing

    Almost six months ago, the “Let’s Talk About It” community forum was held at Lancaster High School to engage in a discussion related to violence, law enforcement and race.
    With almost 200 in attendance, the forum brought together people from different races, ages, socioeconomic groups and geographies.  With support from Sheriff Barry Faile and then-Police Chief Harleen Carter, the audience began the process of discussing ways to prevent violence and other problems from occurring in our community.  

  • Column: Democrats are redefining the party

    We are witnessing the revelation of the real Democratic Party.
    Democratic representatives in Washington have set aside their elected responsibilities to adopt one goal – “get Trump.” They don’t seem interested in legislating, only blocking whatever might be credited to Trump in a positive way.
    Democrats claim to be for the working man, but they wanted to block the pipeline that created thousands of jobs in construction and the steel industry. The Democrats want to block the wall, which also would create jobs.

  • Column: The conflicts of interest just keep coming in our Capitol

    Last week, as the state Senate discussed the so-called pension reform bill, Sen. Sandy Senn stood up to ask a few very specific questions about a proposed amendment and how it would affect law enforcement officers.
    In looking into why the Charleston Republican had a very narrow interest about what the bill would do for police, I found that she was an attorney who has worked for the S.C. Sheriffs Association, based on her Statement of Economic Interest.

  • Column: Sunshine on government is for the people, not the press

    It is Sunshine Week in South Carolina.
    The week is an annual nationwide celebration of access to public information and what it means for you and your community.
    But every week in our state, newspapers are stepping up to see that the public has access to government meetings and records.
    You might not know about these efforts, but if you read on you will learn of some of the outstanding ones entered this year into the S.C. Press Association’s Freedom of Information contests.          

  • Column: Thank you, Lancaster, for your kindness and encouragement

    Somehow, I managed to convince my husband that we needed a family photo. So, there we are, standing in front of a pair of cedars out in the field.

    My husband and our daughter are to my right, and we’re all smiling for the camera. To my left is my son, Chad, and he’s staring off to the left at something only he can see, doing that thing he does with his hands. It’s a good shot, and it captures our family perfectly.

  • Column: State’s schools rank dead last, and no one is held accountable

    Some will think this is too strong. I don’t. Just read on and make up your own mind.
    Recently, U.S. News and World Report released a study of the 50 states based on 68 different metrics in seven categories: health care, education, infrastructure, crime/corrections, opportunity, economy and government. For the full report, Google: U.S. News and World Report Best States.

  • Column: Joining the masses in cyberspace isn’t worth sacrificing peace, quiet

    There is no doubt that the Internet has brought about transformational changes in the way we obtain information, conduct business and communicate with others. This Digital Age gives us great advantage.
    With just a smart phone, one can Google and access all sorts of otherwise hard-to-find information. Through numerous sites, we can shop for all kinds of goods and services and get the latest worldwide news. With an iPhone, we can send videos of choice to anyone connected online.

  • Column: Democrats working to invalidate election

    Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama gave Vladimir Putin a “reset button.” That did a lot of good.
    Putin invaded Crimea, a Ukrainian territory, and then annexed it. Putin sent military help to Syria to squash an uprising against a dictator – President Bashar al-Assad. Then Russia helped Assad kill thousands of Syrians, some with chemical weapons.
    What was President Obama’s response? He drew a red line. He also was caught on an open mic telling the Russians he’d be more flexible with them after the 2012 election.

  • Status report: House OKs 3 big pieces of legislation

    Some say politicians never get anything done. Whoever said that missed recent events in the State House, where in just three days, the S.C. House tackled three major issues facing our state: Reforming highway funding and the S.C. Department of Transportation, fixing the state employees’ pension system, and modernizing state-issued identification cards to meet higher Homeland Security standards.

    Road repairs