.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Ask candidates important questions

    This month, voters in towns and cities across the state will go to the polls to choose their local leadership for the next several years.
    Men and women who aspire to public service are out shaking hands, putting up signs and distributing campaign handouts.
    While local elections may not be as high-profile as the races for many state and federal offices, they’re important nonetheless. Your town or city council makes lots of decisions that impact you, from the taxes you pay to the quality of life you enjoy.

  • Machines enrich uranium moved to secret site in Iran

    I’ve said many times that Iran has long sought to become the undisputed leader in the region, largely through aggressive and ambitious military development.
    Iran’s weapons program is of enormous concern to the United States. It isn’t only former Soviet weapons and weapons – grade nuclear material that Iran is getting its hands on – it has also actively recruited former Soviet atomic scientists. Communist China has also supplied the Iranians with nuclear technology.

  • Many helped Storytelling in the Park become reality

    On behalf of Carolinas Literacy Network board of directors, I want to thank the many sponsors, contributors, volunteers and staff who helped to make Storytelling in the Park a wonderful event.
    Keith Tunnell, director of Lancaster County Economic Development Corp., planted the seed a year ago when he arranged for a group to visit the National Storytelling Center’s annual festival in Jonesborough, Tenn.

  • Not much has changed in Senate past two years

    This is a report regarding what transpired in the S.C. General Assembly this year. In it, I attempt to cover the major issues and a few amusing ones that may be of interest.
    I returned to the Senate in April after two and a half years away and found it much as it was when I retired. The body typically completes 80 percent of its work in the last 20 percent of its available time. So, even though I was seated late in the legislative year, I had not missed much.
    Here’s what happened:
    Collards & Coons

  • Why hasn’t our congressman supported American Jobs Act?

    U.S. Congressman Mick Mulvaney should have the courage to put politics aside for the sake of the small business owners, firefighters, police officers, engineers, construction workers, educators and the unemployed in South Carolina. Support the American Jobs Act.
    The American Jobs Act is made up of ideas that have been supported by both Democrats and Republicans.
    The economic impact for this state is huge:
    u In South Carolina, 80,000 small business firms will receive a payroll tax cut.

  • Don’t compare OWS to the tea party

    For weeks I’ve watched as the media has compared the recent Occupy Wall Street protests to the tea party rallies that began in early 2009. Those comparisons leave me scratching my head.
    First, let’s dispense with the obvious: I’m a conservative Republican, and I have much more in common with tea party folks than I do the Occupy Wall Street protesters.

  • Vision loss research a window to future

    In an increasingly challenging economic environment that requires enhanced innovation to stimulate economic growth and jobs, federally funded medical research provides a remarkable return on our investment.
    Scientific progress not only creates an industry of well-paying, skilled jobs here in the United States, but fields like vision research are producing breakthroughs that directly benefit millions of Americans and their families.

  • We need to recapture our historical spirit of discovery

    Last week we celebrated one of our nation’s most overlooked holidays – Columbus Day, the annual observance of Christopher Columbus’ arrival in the Americas. It was Oct. 12, 1492, that the explorer first spotted land after a two-month voyage from Europe.
    Columbus Day has been a federal holiday since 1970.
    Today, it is primarily observed in schools, used to teach students a history lesson about America’s dawning days.

  • Incorporating Indian Land will cost us taxpayers a lot of money

    I would like to respond to the article published in the newspaper  concerning the incorporation of Indian Land.
    We moved here from New York after being taxed out of our home by the state, county, school district and city. Everybody wants a piece of you.
    We looked at other states and areas in the South. We finally found an area here in Lancaster County that we couldn’t believe. Low taxes, low power bills and a beautiful place to live out our lives.

  • We should show support for our local congressman

    As I wander around our area (the Panhandle and Lancaster), listening and talking to all different types of people, I am coming across a universal thread of discontent. Some of it legitimate (based on the wants and needs of the individual), some just complaining.
    It’s time that we put aside our allegiances to party, etc., and remember that we are Americans first. The labels that we all seem to love are just getting in the way.