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Columns

  • Jones column: Why teachers should hate Common Core

    “Common Core has nothing to do with curriculum, instruction or testing.” No matter how many times Common Core’s most prominent supporters make that claim, it’s still false. Like any set of strict academic standards, Common Core standards directly affect these areas, and thus remove the ability of teachers to use their talents to the fullest.

  • Jesus promises living water

    In the gospel, John 4 describes Jesus’ encounter with the Samaritans. Jesus chose to go through Samaria on his way to Galilee, even though many religious people avoided the area entirely.

    After walking all day, he stopped by a well outside a town called Sychar, and sent his disciples into the city to buy food. When a Samaritan woman came to draw water, Jesus asked her for a drink.  She was surprised, since Jews and Samaritans normally never shared common drinking vessels.

  • Noble’s column just a Democrat rant

    This is in response to Phil Nobel’s guest column, “Will June Primary in S.C. be honest?,” in the May 16 edition of The Lancaster News.

    This issue, along with global warming and the war on women are the biggest scams spouted by Democrats. Think about this, 99.9 percent of United States citizens already have picture ID’s. Noble said Republicans push this issue to prevent poor black people, along with students from voting.

  • Let voters decide how to pay for county needs

    The current 1 percent Capital Projects Sales Tax which was enacted to finance the construction of the new Lancaster County Courthouse is expected to expire in 2015.

    Lancaster County Council has established a Capital Projects Sales Tax Commission to consider what projects should be funded in the event that the voters consent to extend the capital projects sales tax for another seven years.

    Several major proposals have been submitted for the commission’s consideration. Each of these proposals is worthy of consideration.

  • Legislature busy this session

    At this point in the second half of the 2013-14 legislative session, we are several weeks behind due to a later-than-normal start and days lost to snow. Those who agree with Mark Twain that “no man’s life or liberty is safe when the legislature is in session” will not feel shortchanged by this.

  • Sales tax could help repave county roads

    Last month, I wrote about some of the funding and maintenance issues we face with our road system in this county and state.

    In this column, we will be looking at who is responsible for repaving roads in the county, the funding and what we can do about improving road conditions in the county.

  • Where is hope, change, transparency?

    White House Press Secretary Jay Carney says that a recently released e-mail explaining the talking points for the Benghazi attack has nothing to do with the Benghazi attack. Why not just release everything asked for if there is nothing to hide and drown the committee with information and facts, if these facts actually exist?

  • S.C. issuing more bailouts

    In a typical move by the Budget and Control Board (BCB) recently, the board voted 3-1-1 to bail out yet another state agency. This time, it was South Carolina State University.

    The governor, after admitting that “this should be the decision of the legislature,” detailed the agreement her office drafted that would allow the BCB to loan the university $6 million to assist with its $13 million deficit. The loan is to be used specifically for debt service and payroll and has to be repaid by the end of fiscal year 2014-2015.

  • Will June Primary in S.C. be honest?

    On June 10, we will have state primary elections for both Democrats and Republicans; this we know for sure. What we don’t know, and what many are worried about, is will the actual voting and election process work honestly and smoothly the way its suppose to.

    If either distant or recent history is any guide, don’t count on it.

  • Take the time to thank your officers this week

    During National Police Week, May 13-19, I’d like to encourage you to take the time to recognize our local law enforcement officers for their service to Lancaster County.

    Our officers face many risks and challenges and their sacrifice and service are often taken for granted. If you encounter a deputy, police officer, highway patrolman or corrections officer this week, show your support and let them know how much their work means to you.