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Columns

  • Newspapers committed to community

    Comedian Rodney Dangerfield’s famous line was he “got no respect.”

    Unfortunately, a poll by Pew Research shows respect for the profession of journalism has declined in the last few years. Only 28 percent of respondents said journalists contribute “a lot” to society’s wellbeing. Only lawyers and business executives ranked lower than the media.

    But I would strongly argue that South Carolina’s daily and weekly newspaper journalists are far more respected by their communities.

  • Honeycutt has county’s best interest at heart

    Larry Honeycutt has served on Lancaster County Council, representing District 4 since 2006. He has learned much about county government, its laws and rules and now, finishing his second term, Honeycutt is well-qualified to serve a third term.

    He loves Lancaster County as his hometown since 1960. He puts in many hours of behind-the-scenes efforts to help the airport, the gold mine and the expanding commercial growth in Indian Land.

  • World is full of lies, but God’s word remains true

    One of God’s attributes is that he is true. God the Father described himself as being “abundant in goodness and truth.”

  • Lancaster County has some great football history

    The S.C. High School League (SCHSL) is celebrating 100 years of sports history this year. Part of the celebration was to publish a listing of the winningest teams by decade for the past 100 years.

    The June 1, 2014, edition of The State paper listed a team from Lancaster County as the winningest team for the decade of the 1950s for the whole state of South Carolina.

  • County strategic vision very important

    August’s column was about a strategic visioning process for Lancaster County, this month’s column will be about how to get the process started.

    First, thank you to those who have emailed or talked with me about their interest in being part of this process.

    To develop a good strategic vision, we will need participation from the business community, our various government entities and, most importantly, our citizens.

  • Overspending depletes our county’s yearly budget

    The County Council Finance Committee meeting on Sept. 25 provided an interesting observation that the county’s general fund balance is about $1 million higher than it was last year at this time.

    The Finance Committee heard several proposals from County Administrator Steve Willis about how to spend this money outside the normal budget cycle.

    Spending money outside the budget cycle is one of the primary reasons the county never seems to have enough money.

  • Why I want to represent you

    My name is James Brooks and I wanted to take a few minutes to introduce myself to you as a candidate for the Lancaster County District I School Board representative.

    The first question many people ask is why run? I have lived in the area for more than 25 years and have a son in Indian Land Middle School and I want to see the opportunities for all students, faculty and residents improve as our community grows.

  • Winn poised for success

    Several weeks ago, I submitted a column featuring two young ladies from Lancaster, Paige Duke and Julie Roberts. Both of these women tasted success and then faced adversity. The gist of the column was to show how both fought back and overcame the adversity.

  • Pope now part of the heavenly football game

    Some four years ago, a book, with Pope as the subject, was written and entitled “Do They Play Football in Heaven?”

    Pope envisioned a lofty place where the game is about the offense always producing and the defense always making the key stop.

    I recall that’s how Mike explained his thinking during a book-signing back in the spring of 2010 at Wingate University, his final coaching stop as a volunteer assistant line coach.

  • Transparency movement sees progress and setbacks

    One of the keys to quality government is the ability of citizens to see how decisions are made and how tax dollars are spent.

    It’s that notion that drove me several years ago to establish a special website showing itemized expenditures by state government, and to later launch an ultimately successful initiative to encourage cities, counties, universities and school districts to publish spending details online.