.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Why you can’t read half the state budget

    The South Carolina state budget is split into two major pieces, part 1A and part 1B. While both parts are excruciatingly boring to read, the first part, 1A, is at least understandable. At least it looks like a budget.
    Each agency has its own chart of line items showing how much money is allocated to each agency, program, function, etc. That’s why, when members of the news media talk about “the budget,” they’re almost always talking about that portion of the budget they can read, part 1A.

  • Pass Constitutional Carry Act

    Citizens of South Carolina got a rare treat March 4. State Sens. Lee Bright, Shane Martin, Greg Hembree and Brad Hutto conducted a public hearing on Senate Bill S115 for the proposed Constitutional Carry Act.

  • Nullification – are these guys nuts?

    You can’t make this stuff up. And if you did, no one would believe it. But it’s true – South Carolina legislators are once again talking about nullification.
    It’s no wonder, I guess, given how well that worked out for us last time.
    When this nullification stuff first happened in 1850s and 1860s, Charleston Unionist James L. Petigru uttered his famous description of the Palmetto state: “Poor South Carolina, too small for a republic, too large for an insane asylum.”

  • NNA survey shows readers value community newspapers

    Although our society is becoming more and more plugged into the Internet, there are some things the online universe cannot provide or substitute for us.
    This includes the unique services provided to citizens by community newspapers.
    Weekly and small daily papers help strengthen communities, build local economies and report on local governments.

  • You have right to your personal choice, but not to change nation

    Am I a hate-monger? Am I a homophobe? Do I hate those who are not like me: those who don’t look like me, dress like me, talk like me, believe like me?
    Am I opposed to those who disagree with what I believe, and how my belief system impacts how I live my life?
    Am I insensitive to those who hold to convictions and practices that differ from mine? Do I practice hate-speech against those who live differently, believe differently, practice different lifestyles than I?

  • Valid reasons law-abiding citizens should own guns

    Like most of America, I am saddened with the recent school shootings across America. Loss of life is never good, and we can only wonder how those who commit such atrocities can do so.

  • Options for care centers important in our state

    Across South Carolina, options for care for senior citizens and persons with disabilities are dwindling, while our escalating population continues to place a greater reliance on our state’s available resources.
    Helping to fill part of this void is adult day care, which gives family members who care for a loved one the ability to have a break in their caregiving responsibilities to maintain their normal work schedule while a dependent family member receives valuable services at a day-care center.

  • Don’t allow cigarettes to take away your life

    Editor’s note: Following is the essay Danielle Phillips entered in the Smoke-Out Contest, sponsored by the Lancaster  County Health & Wellness Commission.

    Why do you want to throw your life away? Everyone is given one chance to see amazingly great things that the world has to offer and live life to the fullest, so why? Why do you take life for granted? Then before you know it, everything is taken away from you.

  • Why sequester important

    The recent experience with the “sequester” in Washington, D.C., revealed in many ways what is wrong with Washington. But it also contains a silver lining that I hope bodes well for the future.

  • Prisoner changes course of American legal history

    “In our adversary system of criminal justice, any person haled into court, who is too poor to hire a lawyer, could not be assured a fair trial, unless counsel is provided for him. This seems to us to be an obvious truth.” – Justice Hugo Black, March 18, 1963, in the U.S. Supreme Court case of Gideon vs. Wainwright.
    This year, we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Gideon case. This decision set in motion the greatest transformation to the American criminal justice system in history.