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Columns

  • Column: Democratic policies hurt the country’s middle class

    Bobby Collins’ column in the Nov. 15 paper said some things that I need to respond to.
    But first, Mr. Collins, thank you for riding on the Democrat truck in the Lancaster Veterans Day parade in support of veterans. I was out of town and could not be with my veteran friends.

  • Commentary: Mulvaney: Bill uses corporate tax cut to boost whole economy

    Editor’s note: Mick Mulvaney discussed the Senate’s tax-reform bill on CBS’ “Face the Nation” Sunday. Here are excerpts of his conversation with host John Dickerson, starting with an amendment to the bill last week that would scrap the Affordable Care Act’s mandate that individuals buy health insurance or pay a penalty.

  • Column: Recent FOIA cases show need to keep holding feet to the fire

    There have been a lot of developments the past several weeks in South Carolina regarding application of the state’s Freedom of Information Act.
    ◆ The state Supreme Court heard arguments last month on the issue of whether the Hilton Head Island-Bluffton Chamber of Commerce is subject to the law because it receives allocations of hotel occupancy tax revenue for the chamber’s role in marketing the area.

  • Column: This isn’t the tax reform we want or need

    Editor’s note: The writer is a Democrat from Sumter who lost to Republican Ralph Norman in this year’s special election for the 5th District congressional seat. Parnell is running for the office again in 2018. Norman’s views on the GOP tax-reform bill ran in this space Sunday.

    My father used to tell me to believe half of what you see and even less of what you hear. When it comes to what people in Washington or in the media have to say about tax policy, that’s usually pretty good advice.

  • Column: Our community’s joint mission of philanthropy helps all people

    The first recorded use of the word “philanthropy” was in the Greek play “Prometheus Bound,” written about 460 BCE.
    In the play, Prometheus creates mankind out of clay. In the beginning, his creatures have no culture (no knowledge, skills, arts, science, technology), so they live in darkness, in caves, in fear for their lives. Out of his philanthropos tropos, or humanity-loving nature, Prometheus continues to develop his creatures by giving them two gifts: fire, which symbolizes culture, and “blind hope,” representing optimism.

  • Column: Odd approach to legislative power-sharing

    At a meeting last week, the S.C. House Utility Ratepayer Protection Committee was talking about restructuring the state’s Public Utilities Review Committee, which oversees or influences every area of the energy industry, including the failed V.C. Summer nuclear construction project.
    Rep. Nathan Ballantine, a Richland County Republican, brought up the PURC’s legislator-to-citizen ratio.

  • Column: Democrats back policies that help America’s middle class

    Last Saturday at noon, my wife Mary and I rode in the Lancaster Veterans Day parade in the back of Keith Grey’s pickup truck with Tom and Judy Langston. Keith also pulled a trailer with more members of the Lancaster County Democratic Party.
    The LCDP trailer was entry number 59 in the parade. Tommy Myers and his family walked behind our trailer as entry number 60. Even though Tommy is a Democrat, he was not in the parade as a Democrat, but as a veteran of the Vietnam War.

  • Column: Norman says GOP tax-reform plan is simple, fair

    It is no secret that our tax system is broken.
    Did you know that the tax code has not been fully reformed in over 30 years? Right now, we have the opportunity of a lifetime to achieve fair, comprehensive tax reform and make the system work for all Americans.
    Politicians in Washington have a spending problem, not an income problem. We have to distinguish the needs versus wants, which conservatives have promised the American people.

  • Column: Don’t take shortcut of blaming mass killings on mental illness

    After the latest mass shooting on American soil, those looking for reasons why this happened (and in some cases trying to cover for what many people think is the real problem) are trotting out the old standby boogieman – mental illness.
    In some cases, it’s easier for them to wrap their mind around why this sort of thing keeps happening in this country if they can quickly and easily place blame on a cause such as mental illness.

  • Column: A young boy stops to thank WWII veteran

    Last week, I was having breakfast downtown with an old friend. Usually six of us meet for breakfast on Friday morning, but four were scattered from South America to doctor’s offices, so the two of us carried on.
    While we had coffee and waited for our eggs and bacon, we covered a number of topics – one was about World War II.