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Columns

  • Column: The fruit of the spirit: Self-control

    The Holy Spirit gives believers in Christ the ability to cultivate self-control, the last fruit mentioned in Galatians 5:22-23.

    This fruit allows believers to keep themselves in check. It includes self-discipline, self-mastery, continence, holding oneself in with a firm hand, and allows us not to be self-indulgent. 

    The old-fashioned word for this is temperance.

    The Bible declares that “he that ruleth his spirit (is better) than he that taketh a city.” 

  • Column: Irma pricing highlights sad truth: Consumer fleecing is new normal

    Since Hurricane Irma put Florida in its sights, there have been thousands of reports of price gouging on everything from water to gasoline.
    The most notable complaint was not, however, the one alleging a $72 charge for a six-pack of water. Rather, it was the $3,200 reportedly asked by Delta for a ticket out of Florida.
    That’s because it wasn’t actually hurricane-related price gouging. Airlines were charging similar fares to last-minute buyers two weeks ago – and have been for years – long before Irma became a threat.

  • Column: Pastor responds to a personal wrong

    In order to protect myself from becoming overly cynical and critical of the human family, I choose to believe that most people are honest and decent.

    We certainly see this in times of tragedy and devastation as we have seen with the outpouring of love and compassion in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, and will see after Hurricane Irma.

  • Column: Why spend tax money to assess eclipse impact?

    The S.C. Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism (PRT) is spending money to find out how much the state made off the eclipse.

    According to PRT’s newsletter, museums, state parks, etc. were sold out or nearly sold out due to this “rare celestial event.” It goes on to say: “Because this type of anecdotal evidence is so strong all across South Carolina, we’re excited about seeing the final picture. We hope it informs us of the true economic impact of such an historic event.”

  • Column: Nuke scandal reveals bedrock corruption

    The current scandal of SCANA’s (S.C. Electric and Gas parent company) and Santee Cooper’s nuclear debacle is arguably the biggest scandal in our state’s history in the last 100 years.

    It involves over $9 billion in wasted money that millions of South Carolinians are being asked to pay and the wholesale corruption of our State House that enables it all to happen.

    It is a sordid scandal of long-term political corruption, short-term corporate incompetence (or worse) and the total denial of responsibility by all who are at fault.

  • Column: Americans with ‘invisible credit’ deserve a shot at home-buying

    In a bipartisan effort to help more everyday Americans achieve homeownership, Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) and I have introduced legislation to include some of the 26 million “credit invisible” individuals in the housing market.

  • Column: Thanks to all who helped make Habitat fundraiser the best ever

    Habitat for Humanity of Lancaster County wants to thank all who helped us make our fifth-annual Bluegrass, Barbecue and Building (BBB) a big success.

    The event, held Aug. 26 at USC Lancaster, netted just over $15,000 after expenses to support our mission here – an increase of $3,000 over the last event. 

  • Column: S.C. needs to save up for the lean times ahead

    The state Comptroller General’s office released its annual budget report last month, giving citizens insight into the sources of state revenue and how that money was spent as well as suggestions for future spending. Here’s the bottom line: The government needs to spend less.

    According to the report, the General Fund this year accumulated $7.582 billion in revenue, slightly more than the $7.271 billion collected during fiscal 2016. However, it states, “the revenue growth rate has been slowing during the past two fiscal years.”

  • Column: Reinventing public education in S.C.

    Cindi Ross Scoppe is one of the most important people in South Carolina. And, she has recently put forward one of the most important ideas for this state – perhaps the most important – for the last generation or so.
    Now I know that sounds like extreme hyperbole, but bear with me on this one, I think I’m right.
    First, about Scoppe and her idea.

  • Column: Site will show how S.C. uses gas-tax money

    The years-long debate over South Carolina road funding stirred strong feelings all around. While tax-hike advocates made a passionate case about the need for infrastructure repairs, their plan – which raises the fuel tax by 12 cents over six years, in addition to other tax and fee increases – will put a noticeable pinch on our wallets.
    It’s hard to fault those who opposed it, given the ever-increasing demands being placed on them by their various layers of government.