• Noble twisted facts to defend Obama

    This is my first letter of the new year and my New Year’s wish didn’t come true. I wished that all liberals would be sent to an island up near Greenland, where they could sit around a campfire and blame former President George W. Bush for all that is wrong in their lives. Well, maybe next year.

  • Hebdo murders remind us that free speech isn’t cheap

    Journalists did not need the atrocity of the attack on Charlie Hebdo in Paris to know that ours is a risky business. But it has made the rest of the world aware of the price of exercising free speech.

  • Hadicol, spaceships rock small world in the 1950s

    As a small boy in the 1950s, I lived in a very small world; and that world was ruled by people twice my size. Other than the farm, I knew Kershaw, Heath Springs; and I went to Lancaster once to see a tooth doctor. That’s a whole nother story. The best thing about Lancaster was Macs Hamburgers on Main.

  • Shootings make case for making autopsy reports public in S.C.

    Michael Smith
    Carolina ForestChronicle
    Officer-involved shootings in Ferguson, Mo. and other cities further illustrate why autopsy reports should be made available to the public, according to state lawmakers and open government experts.
    Now a bill prefiled in the State Senate could make that a reality.
    Senate Bill 10 amends the S.C. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to specifically make autopsy reports public information.

  • S.C. Supreme Court’s new role: Education czar

    The S.C. Supreme Court issued a momentous decision Nov. 12. In a case that’s been going on for years, three out of five justices ruled that the state has failed to meet its constitutionally required obligation to provide a “minimally adequate” education to students in eight suing school districts.

    As a result, the court has ordered both the plaintiff districts and the defendants (representatives of the state) to reappear before the court and present a plan to address the constitutional violation. The resulting plan will have to be approved by the court.

  • Mail carriers important to all of us

    Ever so often you feature on your opinion page views from political party stalwarts pointing out the errors of the other party.

    I recently read another article dealing with problems in our postal system. Seems Congress has taken Mr. Ben Franklin’s dream and darn near drove it in the ground. They have a bunch of folks called governors who ain’t up to full force making a whole lot of poor choices on how to run a post office business.

  • New Year’s resolutions for S.C.

    This is the time for New Year’s resolutions and I have a few for our state.

    But first, some interesting, though not terribly surprising, poll results: Most of us make resolutions and we are really bad about sticking to them.

    A recent University of Scranton poll says that 45 percent of us usually make a New Year’s resolution and another 17 percent occasionally do. The rest of us, 38 percent, don’t even bother.

  • Family’s roots and wings are interconnected

    The tale told here portrays a conversion-instilling vision. Namely, that a parent can really give a child only two things – “roots and wings.”*

    The grace of these gifts becomes evident in the story that molds the child. The intriguing providence, so striking in the telling, teaches a harsh wisdom, suspended between irony and tragedy.

    Such is the case involving world-renowned neurosurgeon Dr. Rocco Armonda, whose exciting career culminates at the acme of discovering a new healing “construct.”

  • A town that came together

    Lancaster Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is a nonprofit animal rescue dedicated to saving unwanted dogs and puppies in the Lancaster County area, as well as surrounding counties if in urgent need. We take in owner-surrendered animals, shelter animals and abandoned and neglected animals.

    All of our rescues are placed in loving foster homes until their forever home is found. Anyone wanting to adopt one of our animals will go through an application process, veterinary reference and/or home visit.

  • It all started with BBQ – S.C.’s weird, wonderful history

    Recently, I had lunch with three old friends. All of us are proud South Carolina natives, amateur history buffs and great fans of BBQ. We decided to meet at a new BBQ joint that we were all anxious to try.

    As a member in good standing of the SC BBQ Association, I felt it was by solemn duty to educate my friends to the fact that BBQ was invented in South Carolina – as indeed it was. This led to one of the more interesting lunches I’ve had in a long time, as we attempted to one up each other in our knowledge of state’s weird and wonderful history.