• Column: Sweep out Congress, end political careers focused on reelection

    We are destroying ourselves. As long as we stay as divided as we are and only think about our partys’ political agendas, we will stay weak and vulnerable.
    To those of you that say, “I’m not like that,” I say you are fooling yourself.
    We must be Americans first, not political parties. Where did we lose ourselves and become so split that we can’t even have a civil dialogue between Republicans and Democrats? When did we develop this “us or them” mentality? And why?

  • Column: Gun-control arguments should stick to the facts

    At Sunday’s Democratic presidential debate in Flint, Mich., Hillary Clinton played fast and loose with the facts.
    “Giving immunity to gunmakers and sellers was a terrible mistake,“  she said. “No other industry in America has absolute immunity.”
    The firearms industry, of which Hillary is not a fan, does not have absolute immunity. However, the vaccine industry, of which she is a fan, does have absolute immunity.

  • Column: Trump-mania not so hard to understand

    The Trump phenomenon has been the biggest story in this election cycle, and there are so many who shake their heads in disbelief and can’t understand how he is still in the running.

  • Column: Exit polls show party differences across our state

    Unlike a lot of other states, in South Carolina we don’t have voter registration by party affiliation, so the only way to really know who is a Democrat and who is a Republican is to either ask them or look at primary elections.
    This month, we have had the rare circumstance of having both a Democratic and Republican presidential primary one week apart. And because they were primary elections and far fewer people vote than in a general election, we get a look at who are the most hard-core partisan voters.

  • Column: Effectiveness more important than candidates’ spirituality

    I would like to respond to Dr. Frankie Melton, my respected friend and colleague, concerning his Feb. 28 column “Donald Trump the antithesis of the Sermon on the Mount.”
    Dr. Melton opined that evangelicals who voted for Trump in the S.C. primary are either lost, carnal, ignorant or not paying attention to politics. I disagree.
    When did POTUS come to be an acronym for Pastor of the United States?

  • Column: Congress cares about self-interest, reelection

    Millions of Americans have lost confidence in those individuals whom we have elected as our representatives of Washington. The adage that we love our representative or senator, but hate what all those others in Congress are doing, has long since passed. In truth, there now is little difference between Republicans and Democrats in our nation’s capital.
    Oh sure, the philosophies, the talk and the issues are starkly different between the two. But self-interest and reelection rhetoric is what really compels their actions.

  • Column: McCullough: After 8 years on council, time to step aside

    While it has been my pleasure to serve the citizens of District 1 and Lancaster County on county council since January 2009, I will not seek a third term.
    Around Thanksgiving, I decided not to run again. It is now time for me to be fully retired, and to spend much more valuable time with Ann, my wife of 40 years, enjoying friends and family, traveling and doing the things we have always dreamed of doing “someday.” Now is the time.  

  • Column: Van Wyck organizing to oppose IL proposal

    After several months of trying to nicely tell the Voters for a Town of Indian Land (TOIL) people to please get lost, Van Wyck has concluded that these people intend to destroy Van Wyck and must be defeated.

  • Column: Donald Trump the antithesis of the Sermon on the Mount

    There is a dirty little secret about those so-called evangelical voters who picked Donald Trump in the S.C. Republican primary on Feb. 20. Pastors serving in the trenches of daily parish life know it, but few beyond those boundaries are aware of it.
    Here’s the secret – a cultural Christian is not an evangelical. South Carolina is a bastion of cultural Christianity. Many of those so-called evangelical Christians do not attend worship and do not live a life that conforms to the teachings of Christ.

  • Column: Hillary Clinton talks about her spiritual life

    Hillary Clinton isn’t much given to talking about religion on the campaign trail, but she veered off that path in Iowa in a detailed response to a voter’s question a few days before the Iowa caucuses.
    That insight may be of interest to S.C. voters as focus turns to our Democratic presidential primary this Saturday. The source here is a detailed article that ran inside the New York Times on Jan. 30.