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Columns

  • Should S.C. pay for our surveillance?

    Gov. Nikki Haley’s executive budget grabbed a few headlines for its items on education, transportation, and Medicaid waiver programs. One component of the budget was almost completely ignored, however, and it shouldn’t be. The governor’s proposed spending plan includes $8.5 million in total funds – $5.3 million from the federal government – for a Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Fusion Center.

  • U.S. needs better leaders

    French President Hollande and our own President Barack Obama are meeting this week and in a press conference claim to have reached four key points of action and agreement: 1 – spend more on curing global diseases; 2 – work to encourage other countries to fight climate change; 3 – start a dialogue about a transatlantic trade agreement, and 4 – roll back key parts of Iran’s nuclear program and uphold sanctions but not place any new sanctions.

  • Bass column: Few today remember the Orangeburg Massacre

    Unless you’re now a 60-year-old native South Carolinian, you’re unlikely to have any personal memory of the events known as the Orangeburg Massacre. You would have been 14 when it happened on Feb. 8, 1968 – two years before the deaths of four white students at Kent State University in Ohio.
    The new 2014 Black History calendar published by S.C. AT&T for February (national Black History Month), highlights the Orangeburg Massacre. It provides a solid overview of what transpired.

  • Eckstrom column: Apprenticeships help young workers, firms, state’s economy

    For students and families concerned about the high cost of college these days, there’s a unique opportunity available in South Carolina to avoid these costs – and the large student loan debt that often results from them.
    This opportunity lies in our state’s extensive and growing apprenticeship programs.

  • I know why people don’t like politicians

    One of the challenges I face as a politician is that a lot of people don’t like politicians. This honestly doesn’t bother me too much. I work with politicians every day, and I don’t like a lot of them either.

    But sometimes I do try to figure out why that is.

  • Additional ACA Facts

    This is in response to two guest columns concerning the Affordable Care Act – Nick Pasquine’s, “Lawrances’ column was a we-want-more-free rant,” and Brooks Walker’s, “True facts about ACA frightening.”

  • Stop socialism in America

    I’m writing this letter in hopes of convincing my fellow Lancaster residents of the importance of this year’s election. Normally a mid-term election is not that big of deal, but this one is. I’ll explain why. Over the last five years our country has changed. And not for the better. Our president has said and I quote, “I will fundamentally change the United States.”

  • School choice unites, empowers

    What agenda could possibly unite these political odd couples – Liberal Democrat Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee and Conservative Republican Sens. Ted Cruz. Newt Gingrich and Al Sharpton? Support for the rapidly expanding world of education options.

    As we just celebrated during National School Choice Week, each of these leaders is part of a bi-partisan groundswell of advocates for evidence-based school choice programs, both public and private.

  • MLK parade a success

    The inaugural “I Have a Dream” parade and ceremony in celebration of the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was truly a memorable day for Lancaster. With more than 45 entries participating in the parade, as well as an estimated 200 in attendance for the ceremony, folks braved the cold to come out and honor a great leader.

  • Gavarrete family grateful for opportunities in county

    I want to express my gratitude and thanks for the support and love that you have shown me. Thank you for the opportunity of allowing me to live and work in Lancaster for 15 years.

    My name is Jose Gavarrete. I was born in 1978. I am the sixth child in a family of 10. My father was executed by the armed forces in the mountains of Honduras in March 1983 and to this day we do not know the truth of the case.