• LHS Bruins lose big fan

    I’ve been around the Lancaster High School basketball for years and I don’t think LHS hoops has had a bigger fan than Dejuan Thornwell.

    Seems like when the ball was tipped off for a Bruins’ game, boys or girls, home or away, Dajuan was nearby. You would also likely find him at a junior varsity game on the hardwood.

    Dajuan and his family have been on many folks’ minds and in their prayers following his recent death.

  • Now, the rest of the story

    I thought I was through with Slick Willie until I received so many calls and requests asking if Slick was a real person and what happened to him. Also, have I ever seen him again?

    The answer was and is yes, yes and yes.

  • Let’s try for judicial independence

    If South Carolina does it one way, and most other states along with the federal government do it another way, we might wonder how likely it is that South Carolina is right and everybody else is wrong.

    Consider the way we install judges. In effect, the Legislature unilaterally elects them.

  • Let’s put Constitution Day into perspective

    In 2004, an act of Congress established every Sept. 17 as Constitution Day, the day of the signing of the U.S. Constitution in 1787.

    This federal law requires that all publicly funded educational institutions provide educational programming on the history of the American Constitution on that day. Here at the University of South Carolina Lancaster we had several constitution-related activities across the campus. On this 228th anniversary, I consider some historical and current-day features of this incredible document fashioned so long ago.

  • Help solve animal abuse, neglect

    Look closely at the faces of the kittens and of the dog Purdy. These are the faces of innocence, of trusting, of loyalty.

    They are also the faces that represent just a small sample of what we, in rescue, see every day, sometimes more then once each day. Kittens like Milo and Otis, babies at 4 weeks old, were thrown from a moving car on S.C. 200 recently.

    If not for the quick braking of the car behind, they surely would have been crushed under thousands of pounds of the cars weight. That, of course, was the intention all along, wasn’t it?

  • Community rallies for Habitat

    Habitat for Humanity of Lancaster County is pleased to announce our Fourth Annual Bluegrass, Barbecue and Building fundraiser on Aug. 29 was another great success.

    We want to thank the community for such strong support. Because of you, this event netted more than $11,000 toward local Habitat construction projects, which will help provide more decent, affordable homes for income-qualified families in Lancaster County.

  • Bigger audits needed

    The Legislative Audit Council has done a terrific job on its latest report, and taxpayers should be grateful.

    I give “The Nerve’s” Rick Brundrett a little credit. In 2012, Brundret broke a story on a proposed $16 million line item in the Agriculture Department’s budget for an undisclosed expansion project at the State Farmers Market.

    As it turned out, Agriculture Commissioner Hugh Weathers was pushing his agency to buy property at the market – property owned by S.C. Ports Authority Chairman Bill Stern.

  • POWs, MIAs not forgotten

    On Friday, Sept. 18, all across America local ceremonies will take place to honor our missing service members and their families with a focus on continuing the commitment to account, as fully as possible, for those listed as q prisoner of war (POW) or missing in action (MIA).

  • Special tax districts – buyer beware

    Indian Land and Pleasant Valley residents will be hearing a lot about petitions for a special tax district for law enforcement over the next few weeks as proponents seek signatures to impose a $75 per dwelling tax on Indian Land for “enhanced law enforcement.”

  • School choice solution not the problem

    The Charleston Post and Courier recently published a five-part series, “Left Behind: The unintended consequences of school choice, in which readers are led to believe that the hardships experienced by some students at a North Charleston high school are the effects of school choice policies.