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Columns

  • Column: Thanks to all who helped make Habitat fundraiser the best ever

    Habitat for Humanity of Lancaster County wants to thank all who helped us make our fifth-annual Bluegrass, Barbecue and Building (BBB) a big success.

    The event, held Aug. 26 at USC Lancaster, netted just over $15,000 after expenses to support our mission here – an increase of $3,000 over the last event. 

  • Column: S.C. needs to save up for the lean times ahead

    The state Comptroller General’s office released its annual budget report last month, giving citizens insight into the sources of state revenue and how that money was spent as well as suggestions for future spending. Here’s the bottom line: The government needs to spend less.

    According to the report, the General Fund this year accumulated $7.582 billion in revenue, slightly more than the $7.271 billion collected during fiscal 2016. However, it states, “the revenue growth rate has been slowing during the past two fiscal years.”

  • Column: Reinventing public education in S.C.

    Cindi Ross Scoppe is one of the most important people in South Carolina. And, she has recently put forward one of the most important ideas for this state – perhaps the most important – for the last generation or so.
    Now I know that sounds like extreme hyperbole, but bear with me on this one, I think I’m right.
    First, about Scoppe and her idea.

  • Column: Site will show how S.C. uses gas-tax money

    The years-long debate over South Carolina road funding stirred strong feelings all around. While tax-hike advocates made a passionate case about the need for infrastructure repairs, their plan – which raises the fuel tax by 12 cents over six years, in addition to other tax and fee increases – will put a noticeable pinch on our wallets.
    It’s hard to fault those who opposed it, given the ever-increasing demands being placed on them by their various layers of government.

  • Column: Dr. Sims cured a severe malady for many generations of women

    This is a response to last Sunday’s article about controversy over statues honoring Dr. J. Marion Sims.
    The article noted that Dr. Sims used enslaved African-American women for experimental surgeries in the mid-1800s. Let me add some detail and context.

  • Column: False choices limit the path to real change

    Neil Robinson is a man who should be listened to.
    He is an eminent Charleston attorney with a prestigious statewide law firm. He is respected by his peers and community. With his head full of white hair, his well-tailored suits and his air of quiet confidence, he has a distinguished and slightly imposing bearing.
    But none of this is why we should all listen to him.

  • Column: Why Confederate monuments should stay

    Go to Lancaster’s Historic Courthouse and stand beneath the Confederate monument out front.
    This stately monument was unveiled June 4, 1909. It is one of the 52 such monuments that stand entrusted to our care in South Carolina.
    Better yet, go to the state Capitol grounds in Columbia and read the inscription on the monument there. It was erected by the organization Women of South Carolina to commemorate the Confederate soldiers. The inscription reads, in part:

    Let the South Carolinian
    Of another generation
    Remember

  • Column: Action plan for resisting hate groups

    Most everyone was outraged by what happened in Charlottesville. If you are in that tiny sliver of humanity that was not outraged, well….
    It is only human to react by asking, “What can I do?”

  • Column: Scott: President has undercut his moral authority

    Editor’s note: Sen. Tim Scott has joined the national debate over President Trump’s comments after the Charlottesville protests. Here are excerpts of his interview Sunday with host John Dickerson on CBS News’ “Face the Nation.”

    John Dickerson: I want to start with your remarks about the president and the idea that his moral authority is compromised. What does that mean?

  • Column: Probate judge: I won’t run again

    After many months of prayer and consultation with friends and family, I have decided that I will not seek re-election as Lancaster County probate judge next year.
    It has truly been the honor of my life to serve the people of Lancaster County for the last 22 years. We came into this office with the same priorities that we proudly leave with: compassion, integrity and patience.  
    I have always looked at this office as non-political, and I have worked tirelessly to avoid influence by the political rancor of our time.