.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Column: Yearning for old Christmas spirit

    Christmas is supposed to be about Christ and spending time with family, not stressing about how the Christmas tree is not so perfect and how everything needs to be just right on the tree or all of the decorations throughout the house.
    It makes me sad when there are so many people stressing over what to get someone.

  • Column: Judges get awfully cozy with legislators in S.C.

    The Judicial Merit Selection Commission began meeting last week to vet judges for seats around South Carolina, marking the bi-annual migration of judicial candidates to the State House. That’s where the problem lies: would-be judges are kowtowing to lawmakers again.
    On the road to a state judgeship, the first stop is a vetting at the JMSC, a panel composed of six legislators and four other citizens appointed by legislators. It’s the same commission where former House Speaker Bobby Harrell placed his brother.

  • Column: Upstanding motorcyclist objects to ‘marauding’

    I would like to address your Nov. 20 article “No marauding motorcyclists at Christmas parade.”
    Please indulge me as I would like to begin this letter to the editor by telling you a little about who I am and what I stand for.
    I am a devout Christian and a committed husband of nearly 18 years. I am a father of three who leads his family by example, not just in word. I am a U.S. Army combat veteran who served in Operation Iraqi Freedom Phase I.

  • Column: Who among us decides ‘common good’ for all?

    In the Nov. 2 paper, Keith Grey writes that “the purpose of government is to advance the common good,” and “to help create a high quality of life and community well-being.”
    Orwellian garbage! None of that is the job of the government. Who gets to say what “common good,” or “well-being” are? That double-talk leads to government infringement of the masses.

  • Column: Leatherman rules if Trump picks Haley, McMaster

    What happens if Gov. Nikki Haley leaves office before the end of her term? What if Lt. Gov. Henry McMaster also does? Who would be governor then?
    Those questions have been raised over the past few days along with speculation about posts in the Trump administration – and some insiders are getting them wrong.

  • Column: Booing, lecturing VP-elect Pence was rude, vain and sanctimonious

    I have said that I cherish free speech, but I also cherish civility and was disturbed by what happened to Vice President-elect Mike Pence when he went to the theater Friday night.
    Mr. Pence went to see the Broadway musical “Hamilton” and was greeted with boos and then subjected to comments from one of the actors. Some have said the actor was very polite as he called out Mr. Pence in a public setting, but I felt his comments were sanctimonious, delivered in a tone of condescending sarcasm.

  • Editor's Column: My 1st encounter with Linda Blackmon

    Let me start by making this clear: I have no opinion about the truthfulness of Jackie Harris’ voter-fraud allegations against Linda Blackmon after the Nov. 8 Lancaster City Council election. There aren’t enough facts on the table yet.
    With that out of the way, let me tell you a peculiar story.
    If you were driving past The Lancaster News parking lot on White Street late Wednesday afternoon, that was me in the white button-down shirt with my arms crossed, listening and looking perplexed.

  • Column: S.C. chair Harrison raises hand for national Democratic position

    Since last week’s election, I have been thinking about my grandfather. His education topped out at fourth grade, and he spent most of his life paving the roads and highways in South Carolina.
    He was diagnosed with diabetes, and his experience with doctors made a bad situation worse. He told me that the worst part of his experience was that the doctors made him feel like he didn’t matter – a constant refrain throughout his life.

  • Column: Leaders must pursue peace as fervently as they fought

    The presidential election is over, and the world has not come to an end. But still there are those who are going through the weeping and gashing of teeth phase, so let’s try to see things in a larger perspective.
    We are a nation of different people. Some are open minded and calm, others are narrow minded and emotional. Some see the truth even when they don’t want to and others see only what they wish to see. Some accept reality with joy or sadness while others plant their feet, hold their breath and deny anything that is not the way they want it to be.

  • Column: How politicians spend donations

    The elections are over, and campaign accounts are empty.

    Well, not quite empty.

    The question arises: What can – and can’t – politicians do with all that money? While not state or federal funds, these campaign accounts are considered public money, and state laws govern what they can be used for. Perhaps not surprisingly, these laws aren’t as cut and dried as you would hope.