• We’re all guilty of parsing words

    Lies and deception. We say it’s wrong, so why do we do it? Seth Slater, a professor of creative writing, did a paper on the subject of lying and made some interesting points to answer this question of why.

    He first suggests that we justify lying by saying things like lying gets us out of awkward situations, spares the feelings of others, enhances our social standing, keeps us out of trouble and can even save our lives.

  • Ken Burger: Everyone has a story

    Ken Burger died Oct. 20. He was the most interesting, special and unique son of South Carolina that I have ever known. Period.

    If that sounds like graveside hyperbole, consider his one-sentence bio: Born and raised in Allendale, Burger graduated dead last in his class at the University of Georgia, has been married five times, is a grateful recovering alcoholic, a cancer survivor and a happy man.

    Journalist Ken was a stickler for the facts, so I’ll correct one and add a few. He did not survive cancer, and his one-line bio does not do him justice.

  • LHS students respond to immigration debate

    My AP U.S. history students at Lancaster High School have read with interest the two guest columns in The Lancaster News regarding immigration from Oct. 21 and 28.

  • Eminent domain: A new threat to property rights

    Last month, a Senate Judiciary subcommittee met to discuss and take testimony on S.868, a bill that would grant the power of eminent domain to a company constructing any kind of pipeline. Eminent domain, remember, is a power held by governments – not private companies – to expropriate private property for public use.

  • To see light of day, remove fog

    I love keeping up with Israel news, this being a country that has played such an integral part in world history, and will continue to be a major part in the history to be written.

    A rare dust storm covered Israel in September, the worst ever recorded. It lasted four days instead of the usual 24 hours. High temperatures led to record electric-usage demands, and air pollution levels were the worst in the country’s history, reaching 173 times higher than average. Was this a sign of the times, or are we at the end-of-the-age calendar doomsday clock?

  • Willie finishes rest of story

    At the end of my Sept. 27 column I told you I would tell you the rest of the story about Slick Willie from our 1999 visit.

    I left you at 8:30 a.m. on Oct. 26, 1999, when I was talking with Lib Smith, Slick Willie’s sister. Lib was calling from Piedmont Medical to inform me of Slick Willie’s condition and to inquire about our Oct. 23 visit and to see if I could fill in the blanks on the strange happenings that landed Slick Willie in the hospital.

  • ‘We had to’ belief dominates all of our lives

    Three words that echo through history to explain why evil occurs. Three words heard over and over as a universal explanation to justify events that could have been avoided.

    Those words are, “we had to.” We first took notice of these words when liberating Nazi death camps. We asked the guards in the camp and the people in the surrounding towns and they all said “we had to.”

  • Stop sanctuary cities

    Typically when we hear the word “sanctuary,” it gives us a feeling of safety, shelter and security. What we do not often associate with this word is heartbreaking loss. But, as we heard in the Senate Judiciary Committee late last month, that’s exactly what Jim Steinle experienced in a so-called sanctuary city.

    Mr. Steinle lived every parent’s worst nightmare, as his daughter, Kate, was murdered right before his eyes in broad daylight in San Francisco. He testified that the last words he ever heard his daughter speak were, “Help me, Dad.”

  • We have made a ‘covenant with death’

    Bruce Miller’s recent article, “U.S.’s past, present, future immigrants,” was excellent.

    I would like to add to his piece with additional information to explain this dire situation that we face.

    The Middle East is imploding. Islamic State butchers are annihilating Christian and other communities. Putin is sending arms to Assad, while we are arming the enemies of Assad.

  • Another wake-up call for S.C.

    Proterra is a world leader in the design and manufacture of zero-emission vehicles. In 2011, we were excited when Proterra announced it was moving its corporate headquarters and manufacturing to South Carolina.

    Proterra announcements last week should also have been exciting news for South Carolina.

    “The U.S. is in the midst of a complete reinvention of how we transport people and cargo,” said Ryan Popple, Proterra’s CEO.