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Columns

  • Our shared battle against mental illness

    Some of my earliest public service was serving on the board of the Greenville County Mental Health Center – including as its chairman – in the early 1990s. I later served on the S.C. Mental Health Commission.

    Mental illness had already been an issue I felt strongly about, but those positions gave me unique insights into the challenges facing the mentally ill and their loved ones.

  • How incorporation will help Van Wyck

    This is in reply to Douglas Young’s letter, “How will incorporation protect Treetops?”

    The short answer is that incorporation in and of itself cannot protect Van Wyck against TreeTops’ development. What incorporation can do is protect Van Wyck against the catastrophic effects of the unrestrained residential development that will follow TreeTops’ development.

    Cities start small and grow by annexation. When all parties agree, annexation is a simple and easy process.

  • Changes needed in AJ football program

    My name is Garrett Williams and I am an alumni of Andrew Jackson Middle and Andrew Jackson High School, class of 2005.

    I was always proud to be a student of Andrew Jackson because I went to school with good people. I had some really good teachers who provided me with the best education Lancaster County had to offer.

  • South Carolina’s best football for 10 years

    I have been collecting information about Heath Springs football since the school closed in 1969 up to the present day. I have interviewed players from every team from 1949 through 1968 and I played for coaches Calvin “Pap” McCaw and Sidney Max Cauthen.

    I thought it would be an unique opportunity to hear from an opposing coach from the 1950s who played against Heath Springs.

  • Shop locally, improve your community

    The benefits of shopping locally can’t be overstated.

    When we spend our money at locally-owned businesses, we’re often reinvesting in our community. The dollars spent at local stores, shops, restaurants, garages and other businesses tend to remain in local circulation, boosting the local economy and keeping many people in jobs.

  • Newspapers committed to community

    Comedian Rodney Dangerfield’s famous line was he “got no respect.”

    Unfortunately, a poll by Pew Research shows respect for the profession of journalism has declined in the last few years. Only 28 percent of respondents said journalists contribute “a lot” to society’s wellbeing. Only lawyers and business executives ranked lower than the media.

    But I would strongly argue that South Carolina’s daily and weekly newspaper journalists are far more respected by their communities.

  • Honeycutt has county’s best interest at heart

    Larry Honeycutt has served on Lancaster County Council, representing District 4 since 2006. He has learned much about county government, its laws and rules and now, finishing his second term, Honeycutt is well-qualified to serve a third term.

    He loves Lancaster County as his hometown since 1960. He puts in many hours of behind-the-scenes efforts to help the airport, the gold mine and the expanding commercial growth in Indian Land.

  • World is full of lies, but God’s word remains true

    One of God’s attributes is that he is true. God the Father described himself as being “abundant in goodness and truth.”

  • Lancaster County has some great football history

    The S.C. High School League (SCHSL) is celebrating 100 years of sports history this year. Part of the celebration was to publish a listing of the winningest teams by decade for the past 100 years.

    The June 1, 2014, edition of The State paper listed a team from Lancaster County as the winningest team for the decade of the 1950s for the whole state of South Carolina.

  • County strategic vision very important

    August’s column was about a strategic visioning process for Lancaster County, this month’s column will be about how to get the process started.

    First, thank you to those who have emailed or talked with me about their interest in being part of this process.

    To develop a good strategic vision, we will need participation from the business community, our various government entities and, most importantly, our citizens.