• Is your mailing address correct?

    Part of the job of the Lancaster County Treasurer’s Office is to send out property tax bills to county residents for homes, cars, boats and other property.

    While nobody likes getting a tax bill, it’s important the bills are sent to the correct address. The real estate tax notices were mailed Sept. 30.

    Many property owners called in the prior years to complain that they didn’t get their tax bill and ended up paying their taxes late because the bill was sent to an old address.

  • The theme of National Newspaper Week relevant

    In 1928, Frank Capra made a silent movie called “The Power of the Press.”

    Douglas Fairbanks Jr. played Clem Rogers, an ambitious cub reporter hungry for a scoop. He gets more than he bargained for when his big story implicates the mayor’s daughter – who just happens to be Clem’s girlfriend – in a murder.

    In the end, the heroic journalist lands the story and the girl, and exposes political chicanery to boot.

  • Evil is a part of creation

    You would have to be the proverbial ostrich with its head in the sand, oblivious to the events of day- to-day life, to fail to see the presence and proliferation of evil.

    Yes, we observe it in its rawest form in organizations such as ISIS and other radical terrorist groups, whose adherents are bent on destroying anyone who doesn’t agree with their ideologies.

  • Power of press reports news consumers need

    The power of the press rests in the ability of journalists to hold government accountable, to mobilize public opinion on matters that are important to individuals, communities or the nation and to provide necessary information of value.

    Notice in those words not a mention of celebrity content, mobile devices nor “aspirational” reportage that feels good without doing any good.

  • Another face in the crowd

    By David Kellin
    For The Lancaster News

    Editor’s note: The former homeless man featured in this article wishes to remain anonymous, but wanted to share his story in an effort to help others. He also wanted to share his experience of what it’s like to be homeless.

    For a decade, he had no home. He is now in his fifth decade of life, and has not shared his story publically. He fears you will look at him differently, and judge him for the events of his youth. I will call him James Smith.

  • I can hear you, but I’m ignoring you

    A good friend of mine, who happens to be from another country, recently asked me why people, who attend church, act differently during the week than on weekends. Stunned, I did not know where he was coming from or where he was heading with this question.

    I was thinking, well, my friend, sometimes life just sucks the jelly right out of your doughnut and people act differently because of life events. That has certainly happened more than once to me and perhaps even to those of you reading this article.

  • LHS Bruins lose big fan

    I’ve been around the Lancaster High School basketball for years and I don’t think LHS hoops has had a bigger fan than Dejuan Thornwell.

    Seems like when the ball was tipped off for a Bruins’ game, boys or girls, home or away, Dajuan was nearby. You would also likely find him at a junior varsity game on the hardwood.

    Dajuan and his family have been on many folks’ minds and in their prayers following his recent death.

  • Now, the rest of the story

    I thought I was through with Slick Willie until I received so many calls and requests asking if Slick was a real person and what happened to him. Also, have I ever seen him again?

    The answer was and is yes, yes and yes.

  • Let’s try for judicial independence

    If South Carolina does it one way, and most other states along with the federal government do it another way, we might wonder how likely it is that South Carolina is right and everybody else is wrong.

    Consider the way we install judges. In effect, the Legislature unilaterally elects them.

  • Let’s put Constitution Day into perspective

    In 2004, an act of Congress established every Sept. 17 as Constitution Day, the day of the signing of the U.S. Constitution in 1787.

    This federal law requires that all publicly funded educational institutions provide educational programming on the history of the American Constitution on that day. Here at the University of South Carolina Lancaster we had several constitution-related activities across the campus. On this 228th anniversary, I consider some historical and current-day features of this incredible document fashioned so long ago.