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Columns

  • Republicans ready to make a difference

    Next month, Lancaster County voters will cast ballots from U.S. Senate down to county and school board offices.

    Lancaster County Republicans have worked hard to ensure that Lancaster County voters have more choices than ever by helping to recruit local candidates, some for races which long went uncontested on November ballots.

  • I have a vested interest in our community

    You have heard a lot from my opponent(s). I think it’s time to set the record straight.

    My opponent says my experience consists of five trials. Here are the facts. Since 2011, I have been lead prosecutor for the Lancaster Police Department.

  • Holt: We need to do something different

    Albert Einstein is often credited with saying that insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting different results.

    The voters of Lancaster County have elected the same probate judge over and over again during the past 20 years. They undoubtedly didn’t know the true results they were getting. Our probate court is ranked in the bottom third in the state.

  • Players from the ’57 team tell their story

    In preparation for writing the last column on the best football for the decade of the 1950s, I asked Jimmy Horton to assemble as many players from the 1957 Heath Springs High School football team as possible.

    I wanted them to tell me their story firsthand concerning the last game that Coach R.L. Abstance coached against Springfield for the the state championship.

  • Our shared battle against mental illness

    Some of my earliest public service was serving on the board of the Greenville County Mental Health Center – including as its chairman – in the early 1990s. I later served on the S.C. Mental Health Commission.

    Mental illness had already been an issue I felt strongly about, but those positions gave me unique insights into the challenges facing the mentally ill and their loved ones.

  • How incorporation will help Van Wyck

    This is in reply to Douglas Young’s letter, “How will incorporation protect Treetops?”

    The short answer is that incorporation in and of itself cannot protect Van Wyck against TreeTops’ development. What incorporation can do is protect Van Wyck against the catastrophic effects of the unrestrained residential development that will follow TreeTops’ development.

    Cities start small and grow by annexation. When all parties agree, annexation is a simple and easy process.

  • Changes needed in AJ football program

    My name is Garrett Williams and I am an alumni of Andrew Jackson Middle and Andrew Jackson High School, class of 2005.

    I was always proud to be a student of Andrew Jackson because I went to school with good people. I had some really good teachers who provided me with the best education Lancaster County had to offer.

  • South Carolina’s best football for 10 years

    I have been collecting information about Heath Springs football since the school closed in 1969 up to the present day. I have interviewed players from every team from 1949 through 1968 and I played for coaches Calvin “Pap” McCaw and Sidney Max Cauthen.

    I thought it would be an unique opportunity to hear from an opposing coach from the 1950s who played against Heath Springs.

  • Shop locally, improve your community

    The benefits of shopping locally can’t be overstated.

    When we spend our money at locally-owned businesses, we’re often reinvesting in our community. The dollars spent at local stores, shops, restaurants, garages and other businesses tend to remain in local circulation, boosting the local economy and keeping many people in jobs.

  • Newspapers committed to community

    Comedian Rodney Dangerfield’s famous line was he “got no respect.”

    Unfortunately, a poll by Pew Research shows respect for the profession of journalism has declined in the last few years. Only 28 percent of respondents said journalists contribute “a lot” to society’s wellbeing. Only lawyers and business executives ranked lower than the media.

    But I would strongly argue that South Carolina’s daily and weekly newspaper journalists are far more respected by their communities.