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Columns

  • Column: Why tax reform is essential

    When your tax code is 10 times longer than the Bible, you have a problem.
    Our current federal tax code is simply not benefiting American families. As I’ve said for far too long, Washington does not have an income problem, it has a spending problem.

  • Column: Constitution protects vile speech, with some limits

    Most reactions to the march by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Va., last month condemned the marchers, their message and their use of swastikas, chants and Nazi imagery. But there were also questions about why they were allowed to hold their march and spread their vile message of hate.
    The latter question is just one of the latest examples of a recent trend in which some are asking whether certain groups and individuals should be permitted to express views that offend others.

  • Column: Do we need ‘category 6’ for today’s hurricanes?

    There’s been a devastating trail of destruction and flooding in the last few weeks following Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma. The latter was the strongest sustained hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic outside the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico.

  • Column: Well-being of state’s kids continues to slide

    Suppose you had next-door neighbors who, year after year, did not adequately feed their children or provide them health care.
    And suppose that you regularly talked with your neighbor and showed them how they were not measuring up, and told them there were resources available to help them do better.
    But after many years, their kids were still worse off than over 80 percent of the other kids in the neighborhood.
    Would you call this systematic “child abuse?” Well, thus is the status of children in South Carolina.

  • Column: The fruit of the spirit: Self-control

    The Holy Spirit gives believers in Christ the ability to cultivate self-control, the last fruit mentioned in Galatians 5:22-23.

    This fruit allows believers to keep themselves in check. It includes self-discipline, self-mastery, continence, holding oneself in with a firm hand, and allows us not to be self-indulgent. 

    The old-fashioned word for this is temperance.

    The Bible declares that “he that ruleth his spirit (is better) than he that taketh a city.” 

  • Column: Irma pricing highlights sad truth: Consumer fleecing is new normal

    Since Hurricane Irma put Florida in its sights, there have been thousands of reports of price gouging on everything from water to gasoline.
    The most notable complaint was not, however, the one alleging a $72 charge for a six-pack of water. Rather, it was the $3,200 reportedly asked by Delta for a ticket out of Florida.
    That’s because it wasn’t actually hurricane-related price gouging. Airlines were charging similar fares to last-minute buyers two weeks ago – and have been for years – long before Irma became a threat.

  • Column: Pastor responds to a personal wrong

    In order to protect myself from becoming overly cynical and critical of the human family, I choose to believe that most people are honest and decent.

    We certainly see this in times of tragedy and devastation as we have seen with the outpouring of love and compassion in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, and will see after Hurricane Irma.

  • Column: Why spend tax money to assess eclipse impact?

    The S.C. Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism (PRT) is spending money to find out how much the state made off the eclipse.

    According to PRT’s newsletter, museums, state parks, etc. were sold out or nearly sold out due to this “rare celestial event.” It goes on to say: “Because this type of anecdotal evidence is so strong all across South Carolina, we’re excited about seeing the final picture. We hope it informs us of the true economic impact of such an historic event.”

  • Column: Nuke scandal reveals bedrock corruption

    The current scandal of SCANA’s (S.C. Electric and Gas parent company) and Santee Cooper’s nuclear debacle is arguably the biggest scandal in our state’s history in the last 100 years.

    It involves over $9 billion in wasted money that millions of South Carolinians are being asked to pay and the wholesale corruption of our State House that enables it all to happen.

    It is a sordid scandal of long-term political corruption, short-term corporate incompetence (or worse) and the total denial of responsibility by all who are at fault.

  • Column: Americans with ‘invisible credit’ deserve a shot at home-buying

    In a bipartisan effort to help more everyday Americans achieve homeownership, Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) and I have introduced legislation to include some of the 26 million “credit invisible” individuals in the housing market.