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Columns

  • Column: Swamps need draining in D.C. and S.C.

    Since Donald Trump was elected, the phase “drain the swamp” has become media/political shorthand for all the changes that he is going to bring to politics as usual in D.C.
    Although I didn’t vote for him, I do absolutely believe that there needs to be a lot of swamp draining in D.C. – and this got me to thinking about swamp draining in S.C. as well.

  • Column: Van Wyck’s incorporation effort still alive

    Back in February when Voters for a Town of Indian Land first announced its plans to swallow up our peaceful and splendidly isolated community (Van Wyck), a committee was quickly formed to combat its intentions. We essentially formed a board comprised of heads of various quickly formed committees that worked on various aspects of countering IL’s attack. Rosa and I co-chaired that board, whose purpose was to launch a three-pronged counter-attack to the IL group’s intentions.  

  • Keep ‘X-mas’ in your heart, don’t let non-issues intrude

    “Christmastime is here, happiness and cheer” as the Peanuts crew sang on their traditional half-hour special.
    A season of feasting and gift giving, of joy to the world and school vacation days. There will be pageants and cantatas and houses made up to look like candy-cane castles.
    It is a magical time of year that is supposed to bring people together, but it also opens the door for scrooges and Grinches who seem to revel only in bubble bursting or maintaining the true meaning of Christmas.

  • Column: Why do S.C. lobbyists get state pensions?

    With the state pension system underfunded by billions of dollars and getting worse every day, how is it that non-state agencies are being allowed into the public pension system?
    That’s exactly what’s happening in South Carolina.
    State employees can participate in the system, of course. That’s what it’s designed for. But the purpose gets murkier when others join in, such as special-interest groups and their lobbyists.

  • Column: World-altering consequences: A thought on Pearl Harbor Day

    What might have been. These words often haunt us as we look back at decisions we’ve made. A single decision can sometimes save thousands of lives or cost millions.
    Seventy-five years ago, the Japanese Navy sent warplanes from its carriers to destroy American forces stationed at Pearl Harbor. Our country was not at war with Japan. In fact, we were negotiating for peace.
    Japan’s forces came in two waves. The first wave came literally out of the blue, and our sailors and soldiers could do little more than scramble to meet it.

  • Column: Let’s not love S.C. rivers to death

    Recently, I was invited to speak to the Friends of the Edisto River and I met Hugo Krispyn, who lives on the headwaters of the North Fork of the Edisto. He wrote this about the dangers facing the Edisto and other S.C. rivers.

  • Column: Sometimes change is a business necessity

    I have heard it all my life. Change is inevitable. Change is constant.
    Many changes have taken place at The Lancaster News during my 31 years at the paper. Most of them you never noticed. Like when we switched from manually pasting up pages to producing them on computers. Or when we installed one piece of state-of-the-art equipment that reduced our press start-up time, and another that increased our color capacity throughout the paper.

  • Column: Mayer a good coach

    Mike Mayer is an extremely good coach. 

    When I was growing up, my mother, who was always concerned with good morals and ethics, said, “Jimmy, if you cannot say anything good about a person, don’t say anything.” I am sorry that some of you did not have that kind of upbringing. So I am going to say only good things about coach Mike Mayer. But before I do, I want to ask two questions.

  • Column: Believers can maintain hope in trials

    The account of John the Baptist’s birth in Luke 1 gives hope to believers in Christ who experience trials.

    Zacharias and Elizabeth were an elderly Jewish couple from a small rural town in Judah. They believed in God and lived a godly life. Zachariah was a priest, and his wife came from a priestly family.

  • Column: Ag Department pays millions to advertising firm

    Why does South Carolina’s agriculture industry get its own taxpayer-supported ad campaign?
    The Certified SC Grown program, run by the S.C. Department of Agriculture, is “the most comprehensive resource for locally sourced SC produce, specialty crops and products” – so says its website. In short, it’s a state-sponsored advertising campaign for S.C. farmers and agricultural producers.
    It was started in 2007, and it shows no sign of slowing down or shrinking.