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Today's News

  • 2 motorcycles, van stolen in Indian Land

    The Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office is seeking the public’s help in determining who stole a van and two motorcycles in Indian Land early Thursday, June 1.
    Between 4 and 4:30 a.m. that day, two 2007 Suzuki GSXR 1000 motorcycles were taken from 4013 and 4022 Ashby Lane in the Windsor Trace subdivision in Indian Land. Both motorcycles are blue and white.  
    Witnesses saw the thieves loading the second motorcycle into a white work van with no tag.

  • IL woman seeks NAACP Woman of the Year title

    An Indian Land woman is hoping to be named South Carolina’s 2017 NAACP Woman of the Year.
    Through her participation in the 39th annual contest, Robin Massey-Kirk is trying to raise money to support the NAACP’s legal, civic engagement and youth initiatives.
    The winner, who will be announced June 23 at the S.C. State Freedom Fund Celebration in Columbia, is based on whoever raises the most money for the state’s NAACP efforts.

  • Lawmakers pass $8B state budget Tuesday

    Members of Lancaster County’s legislative delegation were in Columbia on Tuesday for a special called session of the General Assembly to approve next year’s state budget.
    During the session, lawmakers considered an $8 billion general fund budget worked out last week by the six-member Conference Committee noted for funding increases for schools, including the University of South Carolina Lancaster, and the state’s pension fund.

  • Gilbert focused on replacing Duracell

    The city of Lancaster’s biggest recruiting tool in its quest to replace the departing Duracell operation, Jamie Gilbert says, is the quality of Duracell’s workforce.
    “We’ve been out there several times in the last couple of months,” said Gilbert, Lancaster County’s economic development director. “What you see is a workforce that is as committed and dedicated to get the job done as they were prior to the announcement they were closing.

  • Cops & Kids

    It was a regular day of patrolling for Lancaster Police Officer Josh Kelly until something caught his eye – a lemonade stand set up by 4-year-old Kenly Banks in the Forest Hills neighborhood.
    So Kelly decided to stop by.
    “I thought back to when I was little and wanted to do a lemonade stand,” Kelly said. “I didn’t get a chance to do it, so I thought I could stop by and buy one.”
    And he did – paying Kenly $20 for a 50-cent cup of lemonade.
    The job isn’t just about making arrests.

  • Column: To leapfrog progress for S.C., focus on innovation/digital

    For hundreds of years, we in Western society have thought about things with a linear and incremental mindset. Progress – in society, commerce, science, engineering, etc. – was believed to be something that happens sequentially, usually slowly, with one step leading to another. This mindset is embedded in how we think about things and express ourselves – “steady as she goes… one step at a time… the tortoise wins the race.”

  • Local 4-H summer camps cover all ages, many topics

    Numerous activities are available for the youth of Lancaster and Chester counties this summer, thanks to a collaborative effort from the counties’ 4-H programs.
    Offered through the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service, programs are available for every age group.

  • 4-H on the rise

    Scott Miller
    Clemson University

    CLEMSON – More youth across South Carolina are turning to 4-H to stoke their interests in science, new data show.
    Participation increased 12 percent last year in the state’s 4-H program, the youth-development arm of the Clemson Cooperative Extension. That follows growth of nearly 10 percent the year before.
    4-H programs cover animal science, agriculture, science, engineering, natural resources, healthy living, leadership and more.

  • District offers free meals for low-income youth

    Free meals for youth ages 18 and younger will be available at four Lancaster County schools throughout June.
    The program is funded by the S.C. Department of Education’s Seamless Summer Option, a USDA meal program that provides meals for children in low-income areas during the summer.

  • Breathless moments boarding cruise ship

    For a hairdresser, the most important skill is wielding scissors and a blow dryer. The second most important is storytelling.
    Cindy Rodgers, owner of Cutting Edge Beauty Salon in Lancaster, is good at both. And she brought a real tale back from her vacation in the Bahamas last month.
    If you run into her, get her to tell you all about it. But in case you don’t….
    “Here I am, this hairdresser from this small town…. Then I get into this major mess!”