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Today's News

  • Lee, CU baseball coaches receive raises

    CLEMSON – Following a remarkable first season that featured 44 wins, Clemson University’s first ACC title and NCAA national seed in a decade and the first home regional since 2011, baseball coach Monte Lee and his staff received salary increases and extended contracts approved July 14 by the school’s Board of Trustee Compensation Committee.

  • Heffner leaving GFHS to assist at AJ

    For Josh Heffner, it wasn’t so much that the light came on...it went off.

    Heffner, who played at Great Falls High School, spent one year as an assistant coach and the past two seasons as head coach of the Red Devils baseball program, has resigned his position.

    He will join the staff of Mike Lucas at Andrew Jackson High School.

    Heffner says a series of unusual events led him to his new position.

  • Duncan takes on John Smith’s role, office

    GREAT FALLS – A classroom a few doors down from the Great Falls High gymnasium almost looks naked.

    The team pictures and newspaper clippings that used to adorn the walls are gone, and a big filing cabinet full of scorebooks is missing. And John Smith isn’t sitting behind the desk.

  • Cox wins The Blade 2nd straight year

    GREER – Andrew Jackson High School golfer Emily Cox shot an even-par 72 in the second and final round of play Wednesday to win the 13-18 girl’s division in The Blade Junior Classic at Thornblade Club.

    The Vols’ rising senior shot a 3 under on the back nine to finish the two-day S.C. Golf Association tournament at 3 under.

  • Remember When: Another dose of ‘war is hell’ at Gettysburg

    Editor’s note: When Bill Evans passed away last week, we had a few of his recent columns stockpiled, waiting to run. With his family’s permission, we will continue to publish them until we run out, in his honor.

    No matter where you are, you need some old work clothes. An old Stetson that I’ve been holding onto for years is ideal to shade my brow, and those Red Camel faded blue work pants and old Air Force blue dress shirt pretty much takes care of it for me.

  • Science + Art

    Campers’ eyes were filled with excitement and wonder Monday morning as the Lancaster County Council of the Arts started its first week of Arts and Sciences camps in Lancaster.
    Being one of the largest sessions, the Lancaster camp is hosting nearly 70 participants this week at Covenant Baptist Church.
    LCCA Executive Director Debbie Jaillette said the Lancaster session has 12 classes with instructors who are certified teachers and art professors.

  • Column: A Trump vote is a stiff-arm to both parties

    Every time I write about Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, it sounds repetitive of what we can see and hear on TV and radio. I don’t think there is anything I can say that is going to inform or change someone’s mind about who to vote for, because I think people have heard it all and have made their decisions based on things like family, tradition and party loyalty.
    Having said this, I would like to challenge voters to consider something else in their decision process.

  • Column: Does my concealed-carry permit immunize me from traffic tickets?

    Philando Castile, a black man in Minnesota who was shot and killed by a 28-year-old police officer named Jeronimo Yanez during a traffic stop, was about my age.
    We might have had plenty in common, or not much at all. But when details of his killing emerged, I learned of one potential similarity between us that also set us a world apart: Like Castile, I have a permit to carry a gun.

  • Sheriff’s office to raise money for 2 employees’ medical costs

    The Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office will hold a hotdog fundraiser next Wednesday, July 20, for two employees who have sons with costly medical conditions.
    “Both children have conditions that will require repeated and continual medical care and visits,” Maj. Matt Shaw said Thursday. “The families have had to travel to medical facilities outside of local area.”

  • Great Flood of 1916

    One hundred years ago this week, no one here knew history-making floodwaters were barreling down from the N.C. mountains toward Lancaster County. And by the time they arrived, it was too late to warn anybody.
    “The old-timers from here who witnessed it called it the greatest flood since Noah,” said local historian Lindsay Pettus, explaining how three mid-July days in 1916 changed life along the Catawba River. “At the time, nobody had ever seen anything quite like it.”