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Today's News

  • Coach Page made great impact at Buford

    To measure a coaches success is often determined by his won-loss record over his career.
    Sometimes it’s more than those numbers.
    You could say that’s true for Coach Sam Page, the longtime member of the Buford High School coaching staff who died Thursday morning at his home after a few years of declining health.

  • Jackets’ soccer stars Gossman, Sutton to play at USC Union

    BUFORD – The University of South Carolina Union men’s soccer team will launch its program with a pair of Buford High School standouts.
    BHS Jackets soccer aces Zayn Sutton and Blaine Gossman will be getting their kicks with the Bantams men’s soccer team for the 2018 campaign.
    “We’re really happy to have Blaine and Zayn in our soccer program,” USCU men’s soccer coach Zach Simmons said. “Blaine brings a great deal of versatility to our team. He has a lot of speed and ball control.

  • Column: Norman says GOP tax-reform plan is simple, fair

    It is no secret that our tax system is broken.
    Did you know that the tax code has not been fully reformed in over 30 years? Right now, we have the opportunity of a lifetime to achieve fair, comprehensive tax reform and make the system work for all Americans.
    Politicians in Washington have a spending problem, not an income problem. We have to distinguish the needs versus wants, which conservatives have promised the American people.

  • Creating native regalia

    From release

    Dr. Will Goins, artist and cultural anthropologist, will appear at USC Lancaster’s Native American Studies Center as artist-in-residence this fall, demonstrating and discussing his work in regalia design, beadwork and painting.
    CEO of the Eastern Cherokee, Southern Iroquois and United Tribes, Goins will be at the NASC on three Thursdays, Nov. 16 and Dec. 7 and 14, to demonstrate and discuss his work.

  • Gardner’s 3rd book recounts local ‘murder and mayhem’

    Miles Gardner has pulled more skeletons out of the closet with “The Claret Book of Murder and Mayhem in Lancaster, Kershaw and Chesterfield Counties,” the third installment of his “Murder and Mayhem” trilogy.
    The Lancaster Historical Commission is sponsoring a book signing at the Historic Courthouse on Main Street from 2:30-5 p.m. this Sunday.
    Gardner wrote the first book in the nonfiction series in 2004, the second in ’06. The stories come from a lifetime of research.

  • Longtime BHS coach Sam Page dies at 75

    Sam Page, a former Buford High School head football coach who remained a big part of the school’s athletic family for three decades, died Thursday. He was 75.
    Page, whose health had declined in recent years, died in his sleep at his home in the Buford community.
    “For 30 years, Coach Page had his hands in the Buford sports programs in some way,” said Buford Athletics Director Eric Funderburk. “When I got the news, it hit me hard. I had Coach Page as a driver’s ed teacher, and he coached me in football.

  • Time to elect folks to run Van Wyck

    When Van Wyck voters went to the poll in August, they chose to become a town and set up its governmental structure.
    Next week, residents of the state’s newest municipality will decide who will run it.
    Van Wyck’s inaugural election to seat its first town council and mayor is Tuesday, Nov. 14, at the Van Wyck Community Center, 5036 Old Hickory Road. The poll is open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

  • Jail time in road rage death

    Reece Murphy
    rmurphy@thelancasternews.com
    Charles Levi Small was convicted of reckless homicide Wednesday in a 2013 road-rage accident on Camp Creek Road that killed 26-year-old Jeffrey Whitener.
    Small, 28, will spend eight months behind bars and three years on probation. He entered an Alford plea, not admitting guilt but acknowledging that there was enough evidence to convict him. An Alford plea is a type of conviction.

  • Column: Don’t take shortcut of blaming mass killings on mental illness

    After the latest mass shooting on American soil, those looking for reasons why this happened (and in some cases trying to cover for what many people think is the real problem) are trotting out the old standby boogieman – mental illness.
    In some cases, it’s easier for them to wrap their mind around why this sort of thing keeps happening in this country if they can quickly and easily place blame on a cause such as mental illness.

  • Column: A young boy stops to thank WWII veteran

    Last week, I was having breakfast downtown with an old friend. Usually six of us meet for breakfast on Friday morning, but four were scattered from South America to doctor’s offices, so the two of us carried on.
    While we had coffee and waited for our eggs and bacon, we covered a number of topics – one was about World War II.