Today's News

  • Why is that peach tree full of paper bags? It’s organic

    Scott Miller
    Clemson University

    CLEMSON – More Southeastern peaches will be grown organically thanks to a $1 million federal grant awarded to Clemson University.
    Clemson pomologist Juan Carlos Melgar and pathologist Guido Schnabel are tying paper bags on peaches as they grow on trees, an unconventional method of protecting them from insects and disease while reducing reliance on pesticides. The peaches are bagged when the fruits are young and small.

  • Hospital launches telemedicine program

    Springs Memorial Hospital went live Tuesday with a telemedicine program for its intensive and critical care units that gives patients access to doctors through a television screen 24/7.
    With the push of a button, a patient or hospital staffers can have a two-way conversation with a doctor within 60 seconds.
    Springs Memorial has 10 ICU rooms and 10 CCU rooms, which are now all equipped with a television screen and ceiling camera.

  • Haley expands One SC Fund to assist victims of hurricane

    From release

    COLUMBIA – Gov. Nikki Haley and the Central Carolina Community Foundation announced plans to increase fundraising efforts of the One SC Fund to help those impacted by Hurricane Matthew.

  • 71-year-old woman loses $5K in scam

    A 71-year-old Lancaster woman lost $5,500 this month after falling prey to a phone scammer who told her she had won more than $400,000 in cash.
    According to a Lancaster Police Department incident report, the woman told authorities that she received a call about 4 p.m. Oct. 3 from a “John Newcomer” who told her she had won $440,000, but to collect her winnings, she first had to pay $5,500 in taxes.
    The police report said the man gave the victim a deposit number and a routing number of where to send the $5,500.

  • Animal advocates win staff increase at county shelter

    Lancaster County Council voted unanimously Monday night to hire a part-time employee at the animal shelter to assist full-time staff who have been working overtime for months.
    Before the vote, council members Larry Honeycutt praised the persistent animal advocates who have been pushing council for extra staff.
    “Meeting after meeting we have heard concerned citizens tell us about the deplorable conditions at our animal shelter, and we have done nothing,” Honeycutt said.

  • Murder outside church service

    A Lancaster man was charged Monday with murdering a man who was shot seven times near a church during Sunday morning services.
    Two other men were shot Monday evening less than a mile from the site of Sunday’s murder, but those victims were expected to survive, officials said, and there’s no indication so far that the incidents are related.
    Kenneth Jerome Hood Jr., 19, of 981 12th St., was arrested by sheriff’s deputies about 8:30 a.m. Monday after a foot chase at Palmetto Place Apartments on Pardue Street.

  • Matthew thrashed outside my front door, howling, screaming like something alive

    Editor’s note: Michele Roberts, a former Lancaster News reporter, rode out Hurricane Matthew with her dog, Chewie, in their apartment at Garden City, just south of Myrtle Beach. Here is her account.

    Living at the beach is, for the most part, a fine thing. The ocean is five minutes away, which is simply marvelous.
    I moved to Garden City in March 2015 after living in the Lancaster area for 15 years. Up until now all has been well.

  • Beloved Springmaid Pier destroyed, but resort owner pledges to rebuild

    The iconic Springmaid Pier, obliterated Saturday by Hurricane Matthew, will be rebuilt, its owner said Tuesday.
    The wooden pier, the longest in Myrtle Beach at 1,068 feet, opened in 1953 as part of Springmaid Beach. For generations, it was the site of countless snapshots featuring vacationers from Lancaster and the other old Springs Mills towns. The 36-foot-wide structure, at 3200 South Ocean Boulevard, drew anglers and sightseers alike.

  • Matthew drags on

    The massive cleanup and recovery from Hurricane Matthew were under way Tuesday, with 290,000 South Carolinians still without power and 434 state roads and 27 bridges still closed.
    Interstate 95 was closed just north of the S.C./N.C. border. Fifteen dams, including three in the Pee Dee River basin, had been breached.
    Roads remained flooded in Horry, Dillon, Marion, Georgetown, Florence and Williamsburg counties, as well as in a few isolated spots to the south in the Lowcountry.

  • What would make this a better place?

    Long ago, there was a famous tale of a magical spring called the Fountain of Youth, which bestowed youthful energy on those who sipped or bathed in its water. Accounts go back to the fifth century BC, but the legend gained popularity in the 16th century with the journeys of Spanish explorer Ponce de Leon.
    As it turns out, the fountain of youth is actually not a myth. In fact, we all have access to this energy right here in our own community: it is found in our young adults.