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Today's News

  • Bruins, Vols split in hoops

    KERSHAW – A night at the hoop saw rivals Andrew Jackson and Lancaster each looking good in “to the nines” wins at the packed Volunteers’ gym on Friday night.
    The Vols and Bruins each netted a nine-point victory for a county hardwood split.
    The fourth-ranked AJ boys built a big lead early and kept the upper hand in the face of a torrid Bruins charge for a 74-65 victory over Lancaster to cap play.
    The LHS girls took charge in the second period on the way to a 37-28 victory over the Lady Vols.

  • Goose Creek captures Kersey wrestling tournament crown

    Goose Creek placed eight wrestlers in the finals, won four individual weight divisions and racked up 190.5 points in taking the team title in the sixth annual Mike Kersey Memorial wrestling tournament at Indian Land High School on Saturday.
    The tournament is held in memory of late IL wrestling coach Mike Kersey, who also served as the wrestling coach at Lancaster High School during his career.

  • Gamecocks suspend Thornwell

    South Carolina Gamecocks senior guard Sindarius Thornwell, a Lancaster native and former Bruins’ basketball star, has been suspended indefinitely.
    Gamecocks coach Frank Martin said in a Sunday statement  that Thornwell was suspended for violating an athletic department policy, but did not disclose the policy in question.

  • Column: Why do S.C. lobbyists get state pensions?

    With the state pension system underfunded by billions of dollars and getting worse every day, how is it that non-state agencies are being allowed into the public pension system?
    That’s exactly what’s happening in South Carolina.
    State employees can participate in the system, of course. That’s what it’s designed for. But the purpose gets murkier when others join in, such as special-interest groups and their lobbyists.

  • Column: World-altering consequences: A thought on Pearl Harbor Day

    What might have been. These words often haunt us as we look back at decisions we’ve made. A single decision can sometimes save thousands of lives or cost millions.
    Seventy-five years ago, the Japanese Navy sent warplanes from its carriers to destroy American forces stationed at Pearl Harbor. Our country was not at war with Japan. In fact, we were negotiating for peace.
    Japan’s forces came in two waves. The first wave came literally out of the blue, and our sailors and soldiers could do little more than scramble to meet it.

  • Weekend Recap: Dec. 5, 2016

    Here's a quick recap of what you may have missed this weekend. The holiday season kicked off downtown, prep basketball has begun and the Mike Kersey Memorial wrestling tournament was held Saturday. Obituaries include Freddie Burton Ackerman Jr. and Little G. "Bill" McManus.

  • Column: Let’s not love S.C. rivers to death

    Recently, I was invited to speak to the Friends of the Edisto River and I met Hugo Krispyn, who lives on the headwaters of the North Fork of the Edisto. He wrote this about the dangers facing the Edisto and other S.C. rivers.

  • Column: Sometimes change is a business necessity

    I have heard it all my life. Change is inevitable. Change is constant.
    Many changes have taken place at The Lancaster News during my 31 years at the paper. Most of them you never noticed. Like when we switched from manually pasting up pages to producing them on computers. Or when we installed one piece of state-of-the-art equipment that reduced our press start-up time, and another that increased our color capacity throughout the paper.

  • Marcus Lattimore, Tahj Boyd meet with Rucker 8th graders

    Eighth-grade athletes from A.R. Rucker Middle School had the opportunity to hear from former college athletes and professionals during the Marcus Lattimore Foundation Leadership Academy in Columbia on Wednesday.

    “This was a great opportunity for these young men,” said Lamont Elder, A.R. Rucker’s athletic director. “They were able to hear about the reality of academics versus athletics.”

  • Reading railroad pulls into VW

    Ashley Lowrimore

    For The Lancaster News

    All aboard! On Nov. 13, the Van Wyck Community Development Club officially established its train-themed Little Free Library, the first of its kind in the Panhandle.