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Today's News

  • News Briefs

    County Planning Commission meets

    The Lancaster County Planning Commission will meet at 5 p.m. May 5, in county council chambers on the second floor of the Lancaster County Administration Building, 101 N. Main St. 

    County Fire Commission meets

    The Lancaster County Fire Commission will meet at 7 p.m. May 5 in Emergency Operations Center, 111 Covenant Place.

  • Column: For fed-up GOP voter, it’s Trump or nobody

    I am tired of listening to all the GOP whiners about Donald Trump and his movement to make America great again.
    Regardless of how you feel about Mr. Trump, his rise as the frontrunner for the Republican Party’s nomination signals a strong popular voice in the United States – a voice for change from the status quo.  

  • Widespread wallop

    A severe thunderstorm cut through central Lancaster County on Monday afternoon, leaving plenty of broken and uprooted trees, damaged buildings and downed electric lines that cut power to more than 1,500 homes and businesses.
    “It was not tornadic, but straight-line winds with sudden downbursts,” said Lancaster County Fire Marshal Stephen Blackwelder. “We did see quite a bit of damage.”

  • Buford Schools on 2-hour delay

    The Lancaster County School District has issued a 2 hour delay for Buford Elementary, Buford Middle and Buford High School due to power outages in the Buford area. All other schools will operate on the regular school schedule.

  • Column: Give Local: Fundraising goes digital

    One of my favorite children’s books is Shel Silverstein’s “The Giving Tree,” which chronicles the life of a child growing up beside a tree.
    It is a story of how the tree provides for the boy throughout his lifetime. First the tree offers apples, then climbing branches, finally shade and rest for the older man as he reflects on his life. In this tale, the tree is the teacher or coach, the boy is the student. Viewed another way, the tree is the community, the boy its citizen.

  • Vols blank Jackets booters

    KERSHAW – Host Andrew Jackson won a defensive struggle to down county rival Buford, 2-0 on Thursday night at Volunteer Stadium.

    The match was the regular-season soccer finale for both county teams. BHS edged AJ, 3-2 in the first match this season. BHS came to AJ on a four-match winning streak, with second place in the region sowed up.

    The Jackets opened the week with a 5-0 win over Chester and then blanked Lewisville, 7-0.

  • Bailey wins Seth’s Hope 5K

    Buford High School track coach Jareth Bailey posted an 18:46 time to win the second annual Seth’s Hope 5K at Saint Luke’s Methodist Church on April 23.

    Bailey used a 6:02 pace to notch a 50-second win over second place Marc Truesdale, an AJ High School teacher. Truesdale, with a 6:18 pace, ran a 19:36 to place second in the 80-runner field.

  • Lady Bruins edge Wren, 4-2

    Lancaster launched the Class AAA Upper State District II softball playoffs with a 4-2 win over Wren High of Piedmont on Friday at the LHS field.

    The Lady Bruins, in the playoffs for the 38th straight season, snapped a two-all draw in the fifth when Ashley Abbott tripled home Gracie Revels, who had singled. Alexus Lowery followed with a RBI-hit to plate Abbott.

  • Jackets top Bulldogs

    Buford opened the Class AA Upper State baseball playoffs, taking a 3-1 win over Newberry at Buford Park on Thursday night.

    BHS senior right-hander Eric Miles, 6-1, hurled the win in seven frames. He struck out eight and allowed a walk. Miles yielded an earned run and three hits.

    Austin Caskey and Scotti Moser each had a double to key the Jackets’ attack. Caskey scored a run and drew a walk.

  • Lady Bruins’ Rivers to play at J.C. Smith

    Lancaster High School girls basketball coach Ronnie Robinson said he expects Lady Bruins’ hoops star Malia Rivers to transition well to college play.

    Robinson said Rivers did the same at LHS after transferring from Class AA school Central High of Pageland two years ago.

    “The difference for Malia is that she came in and accepted her role and did what she needed to contribute, but did so in making a big impact,”