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Today's News

  • No marauding motorcyclists at Christmas parade

    Motorcycles and horses are in for the upcoming Lancaster Christmas Parade on Dec. 10 and the MLK Day celebration on Jan. 14.

    But stunts such as wheelies, stoppies and burnouts by motorcyclists are out, said City Administrator Flip Hutfles. So are horses without diapers or someone following behind them to tidy up the pavement.

  • School district EOC average below state’s

    State report cards were released this week, showing Lancaster County School District students on average coming in below statewide scores on end-of-course exams and the SAT.

    The 2016 district EOC average, at 70.3 percent, falls below last year’s 74 percent score. This year’s state EOC average is 77.3 percent.

    Indian Land High School scored 82.9 percent on EOC exams, which is higher than the district and state scores. ILHS’s EOC average in 2015 was 84.8 percent.

  • Reward doubles in tombstone vandalism

    The county historical society is doubling its reward to $3,000 for information leading to the conviction of vandals who damaged tombstones at the Olde Presbyterian Church cemetery in August.

    Lancaster Police Chief Harlean Carter said investigators have few leads in the incident. 

  • 36th B&B Craft Show next Saturday

    The 36th annual B&B Craft Show is 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 26, at the Springdale Recreation Center.

    The craft show will have 56 vendors from the Carolinas displaying their unique items, including wooden handmade ink pins, wickless candles and specialty bows.

    “We come together as a group of crafters and artists, and it never gets old. It’s new every year,” said event coordinator Becky Lowry.

  • Pups on a plane

    Six cats and four dogs from the Lancaster County Animal Shelter got a private flight Nov. 9 to their new home in East Hampton, New York.
    The trip was a coordinated effort by animal rescue groups, a charitable pilot, the shelter and two Lancaster County Council members.

  • Mayor: Protest timeline ‘ridiculous’

    Lancaster Mayor John Howard calls South Carolina’s process for protesting municipal elections “ridiculous” and says the General Assembly needs to revamp the law, allowing more time to resolve contested elections.
    “I don’t think there’s any doubt that something needs to be done. It needs to be looked at,” said Howard, who serves on the Municipal Association of South Carolina Board of Directors. “That needs to happen.”

  • Reluctant assassin: Pay up or I’ll kill you

    An angst-ridden assassin e-mailed Bill Ardrey of Lancaster last week with a proposition.
    I’ve been hired to kill you, says the hitman, who identifies himself as Ofra Vaizman. But I really don’t want to, and if you pay me enough to leave the country, you can live.
    “I work for my boss Edwardo Sanchez of Hoalim Clan who’s a drug trafficker… and he has assigned me to kill you…. I cannot continue ANYMORE. I cannot kill ANY more lives because this is NOT the kind of life I’ve chosen to live.”

  • Pulte rejects county’s offer on Sun City roads, drains

    Sun City Carolina Lakes’ developer has rejected Lancaster County’s demand that it secure a $3 million line of credit to handle storm-drain repairs before the county will take responsibility for all of the development’s roads.
    In a Nov. 15 letter, Atlanta-based Pulte Group contends that under its 2005 development agreement, the county is clearly responsible for both the roads and the storm-water system at the massive Indian Land project.
    The letter gives the county 10 days to accept the company’s position or face legal action.

  • Rep. Norrell in New Zealand during big quake, aftershocks

    New Zealand is about as far from Lancaster as one can get on the planet, but when a major earthquake struck the Pacific nation this week, Mandy Powers Norrell was there on a legislative trip.
    The S.C. House District 44 representative from Lancaster was visiting Sunday morning when a 7.8-magnitude earthquake rocked the country. She was on her third trip overseas with the American Council of Young Political Leaders exchange program.

  • Dressing up the old library on Gay Street