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Today's News

  • Students and parents invited to Lancaster Literacy Night

    Lancaster’s Literacy Night this Thursday will give parents and students the chance to win prizes, play games and learn about how area schools are building reading and writing skills.
    Nine Lancaster-area schools will have booths with exhibits and activities, including book giveaways, student work and a photo booth.
    The event is from 6-7:30 p.m. at Lancaster High School, 625 Normandy Rd., Lancaster.

  • Construction starts at LHS, Buford

    Construction for new multipurpose buildings at Lancaster and Buford high schools begins this week and will cause a slight change in parking at LHS.
    Lancaster High’s multipurpose building will be east of the school, between LearnTV and gymnasium area.
    Students are asked to park in the upper student parking lot, said LHS Interim Principal Rosalyn Mood, noting the building will be built atop the lower parking lot.

  • Public gets chance to meet 3 superintendent finalists

    The Lancaster County school board has scheduled separate community visits for the three superintendent finalists, where the public will have a chance to meet and hear from the candidates.
    Bobby Parker, board of trustees chairman, said the board wouldn’t want to hire a superintendent before the community had a chance to conduct its own in-person assessment.
    “We picked these people because we thought they were the best choice,” Parker said. “We want our community to feel the same way, and I think they will.”

  • Woman passed out in parking lot with small child in her lap

    A Lancaster woman faces multiple charges after police found her passed out inside a car with a small child in her lap.
    Alysia Danielle Wright, 22, of 1952 Misty Oak Drive, was charged with unlawful conduct toward a child, public intoxication and possession of a Schedule IV controlled substance after four Xanax pills were found in a diaper bag.
    The child, who was not hurt, was turned over to the S.C. Department of Social Services.

  • Winthrop Poll: Trump’s S.C. approval rating holds steady

    From release

    ROCK HILL – President Trump’s approval rating of 43 percent has remained steady in South Carolina for the past two months, according to the latest Winthrop Poll.
    His approval numbers in South Carolina continue to be a few points higher than his national average.
    The 45th president has a disapproval rating of 47 percent among Palmetto State citizens. An earlier Winthrop Poll in February showed similar ratings.

  • Church News

    Week Ahead

    Heartland revival April 27-29

    Heartland Freewill Baptist Church, 1433 Camp Drive, Lancaster, will hold revival services at 7 p.m. April 27-29. The revival will feature special singing by Robert Lloyd and the Revs. Roger Anders and Tony Hargett. The Rev. Danny Castle of Morganton, N.C. will speak.

    Joy Night set for April 28

  • News Briefs

    Republican party county convention

    The Lancaster County Republican Party will hold the 2017 County Convention at 7 p.m. April 27 at Mike Williams Builders, 1351 Charlotte Highway, Lancaster. 

    The convention includes the election of county Republican officers and the selection of delegates and alternatives to the Republican Party State Convention.

    County planning commission meets

  • Coming Events

     Week Ahead

    SMH Masquerade jewelry sale

    Springs Memorial Hospital Auxiliary will hold a Masquerade $5 jewelry sale from 7 a.m.-7 p.m. April 26-27 and from 7 a.m.-5 p.m. April 28 in the hospital lobby, 800 W. Meeting St., Lancaster. All proceeds benefit Springs Memorial Hospital Auxiliary Projects Fund.

    Cosmetology classes now accepting clients

  • Column: The key to success: High expectations

    This column is about a teacher, a family and a state, and one simple but powerful idea – expectations.
    First the teacher. In 1804, in the S.C. backwoods of what is now McCormick County, at a crossroads called Willington, four Presbyterian men decided that the community needed a church and  a school.
    Presbyterians (then and now) place a high value on learning. Church rules require that ministers be “educated and trained,” and thus many Presbyterian ministers also taught school.

  • Column: I don’t believe marchers’ science

    This weekend over 600 rallies and marches happened around the world for science. I watched some of the speeches on CSPAN from the rally in D.C. Many science topics were spoken about, but the core subject was that man-made global warming is considered settled science.
    What they are proclaiming is that their science is real. Why do they need rally for science that is real? They are not supporting Newton’s laws of motion here.