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Today's News

  • Economic gut-punch didn't keep us down

    It was 10 years ago last month that Springs Industries, the backbone of Lancaster County’s economy for more than a century, announced the closing of its manufacturing operations here.
    The Fort Mill-based company, now called Springs Global, was the largest employer in Lancaster, Chester and York counties for many decades, employing as many as 18,000 here and 25,000 worldwide.

  • Heath Springs man charged in child-pornography case

    A Heath Springs man has been arrested on a child-pornography charge that will be prosecuted by the S.C. Attorney General’s Office.
    James Thomas Lee Martin, 26, of 415 W. Caston St., was charged June 30 with one count of second-degree sexual exploitation of a minor, a felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison.

  • Panhandle fire districts raise fees

    The 2017-18 Lancaster County budget includes fire district fee increases for Panhandle residents living in the Pleasant Valley and Indian Land fire districts.
    The new fee raises the existing $75 annual fee on homes to $90 a year.
    Overwhelmingly approved by voters in 2006 in the northern Panhandle Pleasant Valley district and in 2011 in the Indian Land district, the fees are intended as a way for the fire departments to keep pace with the growing needs of Lancaster County’s fastest-growing communities.

  • Sheriff issues warning on fentanyl derivatives

    The growing opioid epidemic prompted Lancaster County Sheriff Barry Faile this week to issue a warning to residents about the dangers of new derivatives of fentanyl, a deadly synthetic opiate.
    Faile alerted the public about two recent fentanyl offshoots, far more dangerous than the original synthetic. The two drugs are acrylfentanyl and tetrahydrofuran fentanyl.

  • Rain or shine: The work goes on

    Rain, mud and humid weather could not stop these young people looking to do a good deed. The Catawba Salkehatchie Camp worked this year to repair five area homes – one in Indian Land, two in Van Wyck and two in Fort Mill.
    Salkehatchie is a “pioneering servant ministry” working primarily with youth and adults from South Carolina’s United Methodist Conference to repair homes for those in need. The camps are held around the state from May through August, each camp lasting a week.

  • Another rainout at Lancaster Speedway

    Late evening showers continue to hamper local dirt racing at the half-mile Lancaster Super Speedway.
    On Saturday, the track experienced its sixth rainout of the 2017. There was one in March, two in May, one in June and so far, racing action has been canceled twice in July.
    At least one local driver – Travis Steele – raced elsewhere.
    Steele took the roof off his late model and competed in the Blue Ridge Outlaw Late Models field at the half-mile Antioch Speedway in Morganton, N.C.

  • New state rules for upcoming deer season

    S.C. hunters will see two big changes in regulations for the upcoming deer season.
    State game laws now require every deer harvested to be tagged at the point of kill with tags issued by the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, according to Charles Ruth of the department’s Big Game Projects staff. In the past, some kills did not require tags.
    The other change is where you can get tags. You’ll no longer be able to get them from retail stores that sell hunting licenses. You will have to get them directly from DNR.

  • Column: Bad stuff can happen if state twists policies to attract jobs

    As the S.C. Policy Council has been compiling this year’s “Best and Worst of the General Assembly,” I couldn’t help noticing a recurring theme: economic development-related bills.
    Some are overt, like one that would create two new grant programs and a grant fund to further integrate economic development into the state’s school system.
    Others are not, such as the bill that offers a tax credit for purchasing S.C. produce. The credit is capped, which means not everyone who applies will get it.

  • Column: Graham: Take Obamacare funding and give it to states as block grants

    After Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced Monday night that he lacked the votes to proceed on the latest plan to replace Obamacare, Sen. Lindsey Graham urged him to consider an alternative that Graham released last week with Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.). Here’s a statement Graham released about the Graham-Cassidy plan:

    It’s time for a new approach to repealing and replacing Obamacare. I have worked with Sen. Bill Cassidy, a medical doctor, on this latest proposal.

  • Buford grad Jayson Jordan Young Engineer of the Year

    Kelly Morrissette
    For The Lancaster News

    Buford High School graduate Jayson Jordan has been named Young Engineer of the Year by the S.C. Society of Professional Engineers.
    Jordan, 31, received the award June 9 at the group’s annual conference and trade show.
    Jordan, who lives in Lexington, is technical director at the S.C. Asphalt Pavement Association. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in civil engineering from Clemson University.