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Today's News

  • Make sure pets are ready for cold weather

    With much cooler temperatures expected in the next few days, it's important for homeowners to protect their pets just like they do their water pipes. Here are a few cold-weather pointers to consider:

    •Cats are very susceptible to the cold and can freeze if left outside whenever the mercury in the thermometer plunges. Keep them inside whenever possible. Also, stray cats have a tendency to hide under car hoods to keep warm. Bang on the hood before cranking your car to alert cats to get out so that they don't get injured.

  • Holding two S.C. primaries expensive for taxpayers

    Recently there have been articles in the Lancaster newspaper about the consolidation of voting polls for the upcoming Republican and Democratic elections.

    Any time changes are made in the manner that an election is held comes under the scrutiny of the NAACP. The NAACP has been at the forefront of equal voting rights for all citizens.

  • Municipalities hope to see projects completed in '08

    The city of Lancaster has residential and business growth on its mind and ways to spur it in 2008, says Lancaster Mayor Joe Shaw.

    Along those lines, the city hopes to have the $7 million upgrade to its wastewater treatment plant completed this year. The upgrade will greatly expand the plant's capacity and improve treatment quality and allow for many new customers in the city.

    "This will put us in a pretty good position for treatment expansion and growth in and around the city," Shaw said.

  • Contribution helps with infrastructure

    INDIAN LAND - Comporium is contributing $260,000 to support Inspiration Ministries' new corporate headquarters campus in the Indian Land area.

    Called City of Light, the campus is being developed on a 93-acre site located on U.S. 521, about a mile south of the S.C. 160 intersection.

    Comporium is contributing the amount allowed under the state's infrastructure tax credit law.

  • Residents already making appointments to see new doctor

    People are already in line to see the new doctor at the new Carenet primary care clinic, which will open Thursday.

    Longtime Carenet volunteer Bernadette King said people have been making appointments to see Dr. Nimal Perera, a board-certified family physician.

    "We already have 50 people who want to come," King said, laughing. "They are so excited that we'll have a doctor - one primary care doctor they can see."

    Perera is the first paid doctor to join Carenet's effort to provide primary care to anyone who needs care.

  • Closing achievement gap a goal for schools

    Student achievement and growth will continue to be top concerns for local school officials in the new year.

    Lancaster County School District Superintendent Dr. Gene Moore lauds local administrators, teachers and students for their hard work on standardized tests such as the Palmetto Achievement Challenge Test, or PACT. But as state and federal test standards are raised each year, the district must not become complacent, he said.

  • Instrumental music program a new focus at area high school

    INDIAN LAND - Indian Land High School band director Mathew Willis would like students and parents to think beyond marching band when they consider instrumental music.

    "If the focus is always on marching band, the program will cease to exist after a few years," he says. He recognizes that there are many talented students out there who are simply not interested in marching band.

  • Healing Horses seeks donations for feed bank

    INDIAN LAND - Anne Laney bought Fancy Pants, an Appaloosa, at a sale in Union County.

    She bought Fancy because she felt sorry for her. The horse was obviously malnourished. The sale price - $30.

    When the sale was final, Laney's granddaughter, Summer Holcomb, overheard a woman say, "What are you going to do with that thing?"

    Take her home and give her some TLC, for starters, Laney thought.

    Fancy's suffering lasted right up until the horse changed hands. Summer found a man beating Fancy with a whip and a rope before Laney took possession of the horse.

  • Coping with growth still a priority issue

    County officials have public safety and progress on building a new courthouse on their minds for 2008.

    Public safety needs need to be addressed for the Panhandle in 2008, County Administrator Steve Willis said.

    In 2007, the county took a look at the general needs of manpower in various departments in relation to the growth the county has seen, especially in Indian Land.

    New staff was added to the probate office, voter registration and other county offices. The county added a full-time deputy coroner and hired more sheriff's deputies.

  • VIDEO: Military funeral in Chester