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Today's News

  • Kershaw town council denies $25K KCPC request

    KERSHAW – The Kershaw Community Park Council on Monday asked the town council for $25,000 to secure an equal grant for the playground-replacement project at Stevens Park, but the council turned down the request.
    The $25,000 would have won KCPC a matching amount from the J. Marion Sims Foundation, a big step toward the community group’s $375,000 goal.
    “We just don’t have it,” Kershaw Mayor Mark Dorman told anxious KCPC board members after council discussed the matter behind closed doors for more than an hour.

  • Lancaster, it’s time for your close-up!

    Lancaster and one of its corporate anchors will bask in some heartwarming national TV exposure Saturday morning, as the “Lucky Dog” episode taped here last fall is broadcast on CBS.
    Nutramax Laboratories, sponsor of the Emmy-winning program, will hold an invitation-only watch party at the Springs House during the 10 a.m. airing. Guests will include company executives, local officials and animal-rescue groups.

  • County crime stats improve overall in ’17

    Crime was down overall in Lancaster County between 2016 and 2017, with several categories falling to a 10-year low, according to Lancaster County Sheriff Barry Faile.
    According to crime statistics released Monday, Type 1 crimes, which include both violent crimes and property crimes, fell 6 percent overall in 2017.
    The total number of violent crimes – murders, rapes, robberies and aggravated assaults – fell 5 percent. Property crimes, which include, larcenies, auto break-ins and motor vehicle thefts, decreased 7 percent.

  • Howard out of ICU, still improving, family says

    Lancaster Mayor John Howard has moved out of the intensive care unit at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte as his condition continues to improve.
    He is in the hospital’s progressive-care unit, which is a downgrade from ICU and features more intensive physical and respiratory therapy. 
    “Dad has continued to gain strength in the last week and is working to sit in the chair and do strengthening exercises with physical therapy,” said Shelley Robinson, Howard’s daughter.

  • 2 LHS students accused in violent threats

    Two Lancaster High School students have been suspended and reported to police after being accused of talking about violent threats against the school, officials said Tuesday.
    “We had some students make comments where school would be the target of a violent act,” said Bryan Vaughn, the Lancaster County School District’s safety director. “Law enforcement got involved right away.”

  • Truck hits hydrant, shuts down courthouse

    The Lancaster County Courthouse was shut down for most of Tuesday afternoon after a large commercial truck hit a fire hydrant on Catawba Street and cut off the building’s water supply.
    According to Police Chief Scott Grant, the truck turned too sharply from West Meeting Street onto Catawba Street, came over the curb and knocked down the hydrant.

  • Finding her mission

    Two years ago, Shanda Mackey moved her three sons from a quiet Buford neighborhood to a loud mobile home park on McIlwain Road.
    She uprooted her family to take over a Christian ministry in that poor, crime-ridden part of the county.
    The Connection, the ministry Mackey leads, began four years ago when Amber and Grant Hinson moved into the mobile home park through a partnership with New Hope Baptist Church.

  • How would incorporation affect law enforcement?

    As Indian Land residents move toward an incorporation vote March 27, more and more say they’re feeling overwhelmed by the often-contentious arguments made by both sides.
    “I’m leaning toward ‘yes’ because I really believe you need to be responsible for your community,” said Indian Land resident Marilyn Marcussen. “But I want to know how much taxes are really going to go up and those kind of things. There’s so much.

  • No eggs frying on sidewalks, but it’s really hot for February

    This is the week winter completely slipped our minds, as temperatures soared past 80 degrees and spring blossoms started popping out everywhere.
    The heat wave started last week, with temperatures in the mid-70s and gusting winds. This week has brought record-breaking February heat across the South.
    Columbia set a record high of 83 degrees Wednesday, 21 degrees above normal. That broke the record of 81 degrees set on this date in 1997, according to the National Weather Service in Columbia.

  • New school gets a name: Van Wyck Elementary

    The new campus that opens in the Panhandle this fall will be named Van Wyck Elementary School.
    The Lancaster County school board approved the name unanimously Tuesday night. The school’s mascot will be the Braves, and its colors will match the Indian Land middle and high schools’ blue, gold and white.
    “There was one name that just stuck out overwhelmingly that people voted for, and there was no contest that the name for the school should be Van Wyck Elementary School,” said Steven Puckett, the principal of the new school.