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Today's News

  • A new destination for Gonzie’s bikes

    It’s the start of Christmas season, so you know what Gonzie Mackey is doing – packing his little shop on Great Falls Highway with bicycles destined to be presents.
    That’s what Mackey has been doing for the past eight years with his charity – Gonzie’s Miracle Bikes for Kids. Bikes line the floors, walls and ceiling of his workshop, with lots of shiny chrome and glistening new paint jobs.
    But this year is different, because all the bikes he has collected so far are going to Texas hurricane victims.

  • Why isn’t IL town vote moving ahead?

    Two months after approval of their plan by a key legislative committee in Columbia, the leaders of Indian land’s incorporation effort have yet to take the next step toward a public vote on the issue.
    County election officials say Panhandle residents are expressing concern about when, how and where the voting will take place, and who will be responsible for assuring its accuracy.

  • Woman gets 5-year term for killing son in refrigerator

    Travis Jenkins
    Landmark News Service

    Angela Renee Blackwell, the Chester woman who confessed to killing her newborn last year by putting him in a refrigerator, was sentenced to five years in prison Thursday.
    Blackwell, 28, appeared before Circuit Judge Dan Hall at the Chester County Courthouse. She pleaded guilty to infliction of great bodily harm in the death of her 4-day-old son William David Paul Lewis.

  • City denies church’s request to waive debt

    Lancaster City Council voted 5-2 Tuesday night to deny Victory Tabernacle AME Zion Church’s request to have $1,100 in land-clearing fees forgiven.
    Council members Gonzie Mackey, Kenny Hood, Linda Blackmon, Mayor Pro Tem Tamara Green Garris and Mayor John Howard voted against the motion, and council members Hazel Taylor and Sara Eddins voted for it.
    The church was denied the waiver because the city had already granted the church a waiver previously. The city has a one-time waiver policy.

  • Kershaw’s Christmas on Main is Monday night

    KERSHAW – If a horse-drawn carriage ride, a chat with Santa and a dose of yuletide entertainment will get you in the holiday mood, you’ll find all three in Kershaw on Monday evening.
    The town of Kershaw will host its second-annual Christmas on Main celebration from 5 to 8 p.m. on Hampton Street.
    “Christmas is getting close… only four weeks away,” said Kershaw Mayor Mark Dorman. “We hope the weather cooperates so everyone can come out and enjoy themselves. We’re really looking forward to it.”

  • Local band Sugarshine debuts CD in crowd-pleasing show at Chastain’s

    The Red Rose City was rocking to smooth reggae last weekend, as more than 40 people streamed into Chastain’s Studio Lofts on Main Street to hear Lancaster’s five-man band Sugarshine.

    The roots reggae ensemble are lifelong friends and range in age from 27 to 44. The members have played in various bands together through the years. But this combination seems a bit magical to them.

    “We knew we had something special,” said Stuart Parsons, 41, keyboard player. 

  • Ex-LHS star Ron Trapps comes back home to work for nonprofit

    Former Lancaster High star basketball player Ron Trapps has returned to Lancaster after earning two college degrees to give back to the community where he was raised.

    Trapps, 24, is Palmetto Citizens Against Sexual Assault’s new Engaging Men Project coordinator.

    The result of a three-year, $346,680 federal grant, the Engaging Men Project aims to educate young men on sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence and stalking. The grant will fund training, forums and annual men’s conferences.

  • 2nd horse shot dead at Panhandle ranch

    For the second time in six years, Robbie and Julie Dunn have found one of their horses shot dead at their Panhandle ranch.
    The Dunns said someone shot their 28-year-old gelding Boss in the side of the head with a small-caliber weapon the morning of Nov. 18. The bullet did not kill the horse for hours, and its suffering and collapse were captured on surveillance video.
    Julie Dunn said she found Boss lying on his side dead near the barn at their ranch on Old Church Road when she went to feed him and his five stablemates that afternoon.

  • Clippers go silent after half century on Grace Avenue

    Francis Faile opened his one-chair barbershop on Lancaster’s Grace Avenue in 1967, and he was still cutting hair there up until nine weeks ago.
    A small-business institution in the Erwin Farm community, Faile died Tuesday, two months after what he thought were kidney stones turned out to be inoperable cancer. He was 92.
    “He was content and never lost his great smile,” said his son, Frankie Faile. “Daddy would greet you with a smile and leave you with a smile.”
    Faile said his father never once grumbled about his diagnosis.

  • County: 9 IL subdivisions may have to repair their own streets

    County officials have given the developers of nine Indian Land subdivisions a Dec. 31 deadline to file required letters of credit that would allow the county to take their streets into the county system.
    If they don’t, the subdivisions’ homeowners associations will take on permanent responsibility for all road maintenance.
    “The HOAs are gonna get ’em, which will irritate a lot of homeowners,” said County Attorney John Weaver. “They bought into these subdivisions believing the roads would be taken in the county.”