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Today's News

  • Buford grad Jayson Jordan Young Engineer of the Year

    Kelly Morrissette
    For The Lancaster News

    Buford High School graduate Jayson Jordan has been named Young Engineer of the Year by the S.C. Society of Professional Engineers.
    Jordan, 31, received the award June 9 at the group’s annual conference and trade show.
    Jordan, who lives in Lexington, is technical director at the S.C. Asphalt Pavement Association. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in civil engineering from Clemson University.

  • Clemson, Auburn lead effort to save wild tiger populations

    Michael Staton
    Clemson University

    CLEMSON – Clemson University and Auburn University have joined forces to throw the weight of multiple academic disciplines behind efforts to save wild tiger populations worldwide.
    The two universities, along with Louisiana State University and the University of Missouri, are leading the efforts of the newly formed U.S. Tiger University Consortium, so named for the sports mascots the institutions share.

  • 2 suspects sought in break-ins

    The Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office has received reports of a number of vehicle break-ins in the areas off Regency Park and Harrisburg roads over the weekend.
    There were at least two suspects and the possible suspect’s vehicle is a tan-colored Lincoln.
    The sheriff’s office is seeking the public’s help identifying the suspects, including the man in this photo.

  • Farewell party surprises Dr. Moore

    A crowd of nearly 30 people surprised Dr. Gene Moore, soon-to-be retired Lancaster County School District superintendent, with a party Tuesday evening.
    District staff and community leaders met in USC Lancaster’s Arnold Special Events Room to tell Moore goodbye after nearly 12 years as LCSD superintendent.
    Moore, who announced his retirement in January, said he was told the party was for the new superintendent, Dr. Jonathan Phipps.

  • Changes for big IL festival

    Indian Land’s Fall Festival will face many changes this year, including new leadership, a later date and some higher vendor booth fees.
    The Indian Land Rotary Club decided not to lead the Indian Land Fall Festival this year as it has done for the past 10 years.
    Started as a way to help build the Del Webb Library at Indian Land, the annual festival is now its own official nonprofit, co-chaired by Michael Neese and Richard Warrin, with Robin Hensel as festival director.

  • Sewage spill fouls Catawba River

    Environmental officials are warning the public to avoid recreational use of parts of the Catawba River after a broken pipe in south Charlotte dumped 200,000 gallons of raw sewage into a Sugar Creek tributary on Friday.
    Adrianna Bradley, spokeswoman for the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control, said modeling conducted by the department indicated the spill passed downstream of Landsford Canal State Park Monday night.

  • Hit-and-run now under investigation

    The S.C. Highway Patrol and the Chesterfield County Coroner’s Office are investigating a fatal hit-and-run early Sunday morning.
    The accident happened just north of the town limits about 1 a.m. on S.C. 207, according to the Highway Patrol. Belfred Cruz Mendez Roellana, 45, was walking along the road when he struck but an unknown vehicle. It is not know which direction he was walking.

  • Weekend Recap: July 17, 2017

    Sewage spill pollutes Catawba River

    Staff reports

    S.C. DHEC and environmental officials are warning the public to avoid recreational use along parts of the Catawba River after a broken pipe in south Charlotte dumped as much as 200,000 gallons of raw sewage into a Sugar Creek tributary Friday.

    DHEC spokeswoman Andrianna Bradley said the department posted signs at the Landsford Canal State Park and the Catawba Indian Nation launch, warning of the potential for bacterial infections due to the spills.

  • Column: The cutting edge of today’s education? Computer code

    All the way from the boardrooms of tech executives in Silicon Valley to the kindergarten class at Voyager Charter School in Charleston, the coding movement is sweeping the country.
    So, who is behind the coding movement?

  • 150 local kids learn sports skills, exercise their faith at VSO camps

    Kelly Morrissette

    For The Lancaster News

    More than 30 volunteers from local churches came together this week for Victory Sports Outreach, a summer sports camp and ministry that included 150 local children.

    It’s the program’s third successful year, spreading the messages of devotion to God and healthy living.