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Today's News

  • Better choices, better future

    Today’s choices shape my future profusely. Sir Isaac Newton wrote and proved the Law of Physics that “for every action there is a reaction.”

    Everyone knows there are good choices and bad choices. Everyone has made each of them, more than others. The things we do today affect everything that happens in the future. Once people understand that not only the things they do, but the things people around them do, affect them just as much, they can begin to make better on difficult choices.

  • Not another company like Springs

    “There will always be companies making sheets and towels, but we’re not likely to see a company the likes of Springs Industries ever again. Nor is there likely to be another (CEO) like Crandall Bowles, the last president of the freestanding Springs.”

  • An open letter to John Baker regarding concrete plant issues

    I am writing to you in reference to your comments made at the Nov. 26 County Council meeting, as quoted in the Dec. 5 issue of Carolina Gateway. I am also copying as many of the county officials that I have addresses, in addition to the Carolina Gateway. You and I have previously met and discussed some of these concerns in regard to your proposed nuisance ordinance.

  • Paper needs to change way it chooses headline stories

    On Dec. 1, I lost my son, Jason Payne, in an auto accident. Unless you’re a mom who has experienced the loss of a child, you will never know my grief and pain.

    My son’s accident not only made the Sunday paper, but for some reason unknown to me, the paper felt it should have been the headliner that day. I wanted to scream every time I saw a Lancaster News paper box on the day of my son’s wake.

  • Christmas breakfast: Let slow cooker do all the work

    Growing up on Erwin Farm, Christmas breakfast at our house meant fresh sausage and country-sliced bacon from the "freezer locker" (Lancaster Frozen Foods) and tons of Daddy's pancakes loaded with strawberries and blueberries.

    Folks, we're talking about platters full enough to feed Granny and Granddaddy Williams and Granny Summers, along with every neighbor and young'un within shouting distance, which usually happened. Our house was filled with the aroma of maple syrup, hot coffee and pancakes.

  • Former Springs employees try to move on, find new jobs

    Tammy Roberts, who worked nearly 30 years at Springs' Grace Complex, never thought she'd see the day when she had to look for another job.

    She loved her role as an administrative clerk and thought her job would be around long after she retired. But for Roberts and hundreds of others, that's not the case.

    Springs Global, which has been phasing out jobs for years, announced this summer that it was shutting down the Grace Finishing and Grace Fabrication operations in Lancaster and the H.W. Close plant in Fort Lawn and relocating to Brazil.

  • Number of foster parents here at all-time low

    Lancaster County could use at least 10 new foster families, said a local Department of Social Services official.

    There are 23 foster families right now, who serve across many need areas for the department. The number of foster families here is at an all-time low, and some children are now staying in temporary facilities for extended periods of time, said foster care caseworker Craig Casey.

    "We need homes of all types," Casey said, noting that families from all areas of the county and people of all ages are needed to be foster parents.

  • Monroe man, 62, dies in S.C. 160 wreck

    INDIAN LAND – A Monroe man was killed in a head-on collision on S.C. 160 on Sunday.

    David Franklin Hobbs Sr., 62, died of abdominal bleeding about 4 p.m. at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, said Lancaster County Coroner Mike Morris.

    His wife, Bonnie Hobbs, 62, was taken to the hospital with serious injuries. The couple had to be extricated from their 2006 Chevrolet pickup, said S.C. Highway Patrol Lance Cpl. Ron Johnson.

  • 'Tis the season for mailing

    You may find that lines at the post office have been getting longer as Christmas nears.

    Monday marked the busiest mailing day of the year for the U.S. Postal Service, with nearly one billion pieces of mail entering the system – up from a daily average of 703 million pieces.

    And today is believed to be the busiest delivery day of the year.

    About 20 million pounds of mail is expected to be delivered to military installations around the world this holiday season.

    Deadlines, deadlines

  • Put up decorative flags that represents Christ’s birthday

    I can’t believe that the people of this town would even put up flags saying Happy Holidays. No wonder things are as bad as they are in this town. No jobs, no companies wanting to come here. This is the season to celebrate Jesus’ birthday.

    If we are ashamed to mention the word Christmas in the town of Lancaster then we can’t expect great things to happen here. We shouldn’t be ashamed to say Merry Christmas. Without Christ’s birthday there would be nothing to celebrate.