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Today's News

  • You can make a difference in the life of abused child

    February is Black History Month, a time for us to celebrate the contributions of African Americans throughout our history.

    Many pivotal African Americans have exemplified through their lives the power of advocacy and volunteerism, from Frederick Douglass to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Black History Month is a time to reflect on how we can help change the lives of others less fortunate by speaking out on their behalf.

    Everyone can be great because everyone can serve, King said.

  • Volunteers crown Knights

    Andrew Jackson capped play in the North Central preseason baseball tournament, taking a 12-4 win over the Knights on Wednesday at the NCHS field.

    AJ sophomore Dylan McKittrick was the winner, working four innings and fanning five batters. Lance Horton went three innings to notch the save. He struck out three.

    Daniel Pardue led the Vols' 10-hit attack with three hits and a walk. Senior catcher Greg Cook rapped two doubles. Justin Hinson added a triple for the winners.

  • Land trust benefits us all

    When you look at a map of the Heritage Tract, you see slivers of property cut out on both sides of the Catawba River in Lancaster and Chester counties and dipping into Fairfield County. The state of South Carolina bought the 1,540-acre tract last fall for $5.4 million.

    The Katawba Valley Land Trust bought 200 acres in the same vicinity from Crescent Resources earlier this year. The nonprofit land trust has received donated conservation easements from Crescent for 161 acres with water frontage on Fishing Creek in Chester County and Camp Creek in Lancaster County.

  • We must do more to educate African Americans

    Carter G. Woodson, a noted African American historian and educator, poignantly said, "When you control a man's thinking you do not have to worry about his actions. You do not to tell him not to stand here or go yonder. He will find his 'proper place' and will stay in it. You do not need to send him to the back door. He will go without being told. In fact, if there is no back door, he will cut one for his special benefit. His education makes it necessary."

  • Some Panhandle residents think they pay more for water

    Carrie Miller said saving water is a waste, since she gets charged the same rate whether she uses 2,000 gallons of water or half that.

    She and her husband cut their water usage to about 1,000 gallons a month at the height of the drought last year, but ended up paying nearly the same amount for half as much water. She wants to know why.

  • Powers-Norrell would be 'treasure to Senate'

    This letter in response to Dave Zoglmans letter "Powers-Norrell throws first dirt in Senate race," printed in the Feb. 20 edition of The Lancaster News. I am a Buford High School senior. Neither my teacher, classmates and I quite understand the article.

    As far as throwing the first dirt goes I think you just did. I challenge you to find one flaw with Mandy Powers-Norrell.

    She was one of the most intelligent who ever graduated from Lancaster High School and the USC School of Law. Our district should be honored that she is representing us.

  • Pride in black history emphasized at gala - Picture Slideshow included

    Music was the backdrop for an evening filled with much praise, celebration and reflection about black history as February draws to a close.

    A black history gala was held Wednesday night at Bundy Auditorium at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

    Press play on video player when photo gallery loads.

  • Writer: Animals should not be equalized to humans

    I would like to thank Lancaster residents Mary Reimers "Time to change animal abuse laws" and Barbara Small "Writer proud of legislators for protecting animal rights" and John Goodwin from the U.S. Humane Society for their replies to my letter "Anti-cockfighters seek to take away rights."

    Thanks for proving my point that people are personifying animals with human emotions and souls that they don't have. Thank you for proving that rash emotions are superceding common sense and empathy for your fellow man in regard for laws and accompanying penalties.

  • County offering 'corporate welfare package' to Continental

    When Continental Tire suspended production at its Charlotte plant and sent those jobs overseas to Brazil and other countries, scores of Lancaster County residents lost their jobs.

    This created a tax burden on Lancaster County and an impact on commerce when those folks' disposable income was eliminated. Not only that, soon after the production suspension, Continental Tire implemented terms requiring some of their retirees at one point to pay more than $1,600 for health care.

  • Official hurt helping out at accident

    A county official hurt his toe in the line of duty on Tuesday.

    It wasn’t a sheriff’s deputy or firefighter, whose jobs sometimes put them in danger. It was Lancaster County Administrator Steve Willis.

    Willis and county Planning Director Chris Karres were driving back from Indian Land on U.S. 521 about 4:30 p.m. Tuesday. At the intersection of U.S. 521 and S.C. 9 Bypass at the Lancaster city limits, they came upon a wreck that had just happened.

    They didn’t see the wreck occur, Karres said. But no emergency workers had arrived at the scene.