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Today's News

  • Landrum halts Warriors' bid

    Landrum halted Indian Land High School’s dual wrestling state title hopes with a 39-38 win in the Class A Upper State wrestling tournament semifinals on Saturday in the IL gym.The Warriors’ tough loss was decided on a team point deduction for unsportsmanlike conduct following the 160-pound match.“We lost the match basically for being undisciplined,” Warriors’ coach Mike Kersey said. “We didn’t wrestle fundamentally sound in some weight classes. It’s been a problem all season.

  • Bantam Chef draws a crowd

    KERSHAW – The Bantam Chef, meaning either "feisty" or "small" chef, has been a downtown Kershaw institution for years.

    When locals David and Sue Sullivan bought the restaurant from Frank and Dot Evans in 2006, they kept Evans' classics, such as hamburgers, hot dogs and barbecue, but added the all-you-can eat buffet and opened seven days a week.

    "We've kept exactly what Frank had, but we have added," said Sue Sullivan.

    The Saturday breakfast buffet offers large portions of the traditional Southern breakfast fare.

  • Mussels barometer of water quality

    First identified in 1852, the Carolina heelsplitter thrived in the Pee Dee, Catawba, Savannah and Saluda river systems of both North Carolina and South Carolina.

    More than 100 years of growth in the Charlotte area has altered the water quality such that only small colonies exist today. The heelsplitter was put on the Endangered Species list in 1993 and is federally protected.

  • DHEC fines housing developer $15,000

    INDIAN LAND _ Lawson's Bend LLC, developer of Indian Land's Edenmoor subdivision, was recently fined $15,000 after conferences last year with the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control regarding inspections at the work site.

    The fine was received in early January and Lawson's Bend spokesman Sean Calloway said Jan. 30 that it will be paid within two weeks. He said, however, that contractor BRS will actually pay the fine since it was responsible for placing silt fences on the site, which were used to control sediment and silt run-off during sewer construction.

  • Seniors push state to continue funding

    An effort is under way to get state lawmakers to buck Gov. Mark Sanford's request to remove funding that's helped seniors get hot meals and transportation.

    Sanford eliminated a $2.9 million request from his proposed $6.8 billion state budget that would go to the Lt. Governor's Office on Aging. In a supplemental funding bill that passed last year, the $2.9 million was distributed to senior centers across the state in 2007-08.

  • County Council's agenda is short for Monday's meeting

    County Council has a short agenda for Monday night's meeting.

    The action items on the agenda are consent items, which means council members approved first and second readings of them already, and these items won't be discussed.

    One action item on the agenda is final reading of a development agreement between Greenwood Development Corp. and the county related to the Liberty Hill Farms development on the Catawba River.

    Final approval to rezone property for the York Development Group for a commercial development, the Village at Doby's Bridge Road, is also on the agenda.

  • Plyler recognized as a dedicated county worker

    Though she could retire, Irene Plyler isn't ready to give up her job in county government.

    Plyler, 63, serves as clerk to Lancaster County Council and assistant to the county administrator, a post she's held for 30 years. She was recognized Monday night as the county Employee of the Quarter.

    "I like working, I like my job," Plyler said. "I don't think I would like staying at home."

  • Hagwood's cousin offers her the kidney she needs

    There's a photo album inside Crystal Hagwood's apartment that reminds her of all the things she used to do.

    When she attended Lancaster High School, Hagwood was a member of the cheerleading squad and loved to play basketball. She even did some part-time modeling.

    Hagwood enjoyed exercise and never thought twice about going from place to place. Now her health requires her to stay indoors a lot.

    Hagwood, 26, suffers from diabetes and kidney failure. The diabetes has resulted in anemia, restless leg syndrome, high blood pressure and poor circulation.

  • District explores idea of single-gender classes

    Lancaster County School District personnel are exploring the idea of bringing single-gender classes into the fold here.

    Proponents say that separating boys and girls would allow teachers to key in on that gender's general learning style, which they hope would increase student achievement. Nearly 90 schools in the state feature single-gender classrooms, but no school in the district now offers the choice.

  • Lady Bruins surge to swat FM Jackets

    The Lancaster Lady Bruins came on strong in the late stages to notch a 42-30 comeback road win over Fort Mill in Region III-AAAA basketball play Friday night.The LHS girls’ victory gave the Bruins a split after Lancaster dropped an 89-78 loss in the boys’ game.The Lady Bruins, down 20-17 at the half, used a torrid defensive effort to net the win.Lancaster allowed only 10 second-half points, including two field goals, to gain the 12-point victory.Lancaster, with an 11-6 third-period spurt, took a 28-26 lead into the final period an