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Today's News

  • Uncle Walter gave up his cows and plows for oxen

    A former classmate is curious about a previous “Remember When” column that chronicles the adventures of some Lancaster boys who erected steel power transmission towers across the rugged mountainous sections of Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio.

    I’ve searched my records high and low, but I just can’t a copy of it for her.

    Not to be outdone, here’s a few details about those long ago days that will hopefully answer her questions.

  • Indiana professor retraces John Lawson's river trek to find 1750 trader routes

    When it comes to the Great Wagon Road, Jim Riley knows there had to be more than one shallow ford along the Catawba River where 18th-century traders crossed and branched out into the Carolina Backcountry.

    Now he’s trying to find them.

    Riley, an author and retired history professor at Indiana University, was in Lancaster this week on a “personal quest of a retired man with too much time on his hands.”

  • County Council to hold planning session Saturday

    County Council members will roll up their sleeves and get to work for a special session on Saturday.

    Council's annual planning session kicks off at 8 a.m. at the Carole Ray Dowling Center at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster. Council holds the planning session each year to talk with department heads about their needs, before council members begin formulating the next year's budget.

    The first topic of discussion is fire protection with Lancaster County Emergency Management Director Morris Russell.

  • LHS booters face challenging season

    First-year Lancaster High School soccer coach Bo Sylvia said the Bruins are starting from scratch, but are shooting to make their mark in time.“We know we’re in a complete rebuilding mode,” said Sylvia who will be guiding a team which won only two matches last season. “We’re facing a challenge, but we look forward to the challenge. We hope to have a surprise or two this season.”Sylvia, a Panama native, has coached high school soccer in Missouri, N.C. and S.C.

  • We are responsible for treatment of animals

    We are responsible for treatment of animals

    This is in response to Louis Jensan's letter, "Anti-cockfighters seek to take away rights," in the Feb. 17 edition of The Lancaster News. His letter once again makes our county and state look like the guffaw hillbillies that just won't die.

  • You can make a difference in the life of abused child

    February is Black History Month, a time for us to celebrate the contributions of African Americans throughout our history.

    Many pivotal African Americans have exemplified through their lives the power of advocacy and volunteerism, from Frederick Douglass to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Black History Month is a time to reflect on how we can help change the lives of others less fortunate by speaking out on their behalf.

    Everyone can be great because everyone can serve, King said.

  • Volunteers crown Knights

    Andrew Jackson capped play in the North Central preseason baseball tournament, taking a 12-4 win over the Knights on Wednesday at the NCHS field.

    AJ sophomore Dylan McKittrick was the winner, working four innings and fanning five batters. Lance Horton went three innings to notch the save. He struck out three.

    Daniel Pardue led the Vols' 10-hit attack with three hits and a walk. Senior catcher Greg Cook rapped two doubles. Justin Hinson added a triple for the winners.

  • Land trust benefits us all

    When you look at a map of the Heritage Tract, you see slivers of property cut out on both sides of the Catawba River in Lancaster and Chester counties and dipping into Fairfield County. The state of South Carolina bought the 1,540-acre tract last fall for $5.4 million.

    The Katawba Valley Land Trust bought 200 acres in the same vicinity from Crescent Resources earlier this year. The nonprofit land trust has received donated conservation easements from Crescent for 161 acres with water frontage on Fishing Creek in Chester County and Camp Creek in Lancaster County.

  • We must do more to educate African Americans

    Carter G. Woodson, a noted African American historian and educator, poignantly said, "When you control a man's thinking you do not have to worry about his actions. You do not to tell him not to stand here or go yonder. He will find his 'proper place' and will stay in it. You do not need to send him to the back door. He will go without being told. In fact, if there is no back door, he will cut one for his special benefit. His education makes it necessary."

  • Some Panhandle residents think they pay more for water

    Carrie Miller said saving water is a waste, since she gets charged the same rate whether she uses 2,000 gallons of water or half that.

    She and her husband cut their water usage to about 1,000 gallons a month at the height of the drought last year, but ended up paying nearly the same amount for half as much water. She wants to know why.