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Today's News

  • Voter ID, new technology make this election different

    Prepared voters and new technology should make voting in this year’s General Election Nov. 8 a more efficient process despite the expected lines characteristic of presidential elections.
    “The biggest change since the last presidential election is the voter ID law, which was passed in 2014,” said Lancaster County Elections Director Mary Ann Hudson.

  • Kershaw holding hearing on oak trees

    The town of Kershaw will hold a public hearing at 7 p.m. Thursday about the town council’s decision last month to cut down four 100-year-old oak trees at the intersection of North Matson and East Marion streets.
    Kershaw mayor Mark Dorman called the trees a sticky subject.
    “This is something town officials clearly see both sides of,” Dorman said. “We’re supposed to represent all our citizens, which is why we need their input before going forward.”

  • Car flips but man unhurt
  • Local civil rights pioneer Larry Dixon dies

    Lancaster civil rights leader Larry Darnell Dixon Jr., past president of the county NAACP, died Saturday after a long illness. He was 75.
    “Larry was one of my dearest friends,” said county council member Charlene McGriff, who partnered with Dixon on civil rights efforts for more than 30 years. “He loved his family, his church and the NAACP…. He was a pioneer in civil rights in Lancaster.”

  • Solicitor takes over collecting bad checks for businesses

    Collecting on bad checks has always been one of the unavoidable hassles of business ownership, and writing a bad check can result in a damaging criminal record.
    A program launched this week by the 6th Circuit Solicitor’s Office aims to eliminate both of those problems.
    Solicitor Randy Newman’s new Worthless Check Unit will now handle all communication with the check writer, collect the money, pay the business and collect a fee for all that work. Check writers who pay up will have no criminal record. Those who don’t will be prosecuted.

  • $1,500 reward in tombstone vandalism

    A $1,500 reward is being offered to anyone who can help authorities arrest and convict the vandals who damaged gravestones last month in the Olde Presbyterian Church cemetery on West Arch Street.
    The award is being jointly offered by the Lancaster County Society for Historical Preservation and Crime Stoppers. Crime Stoppers is offering a $1,000 reward and the historical society is offering $500.

  • Hermine jolts storm-trackers
  • New club: Fun, fellowship, pride for young people with disabilities

    Hoping to help new friends reach their goals, junior Grace Trumpower is bringing a new club for teens and young adults with disabilities to Indian Land High School.
    The club, EQUIP, is part of Able South Carolina, a self-empowerment nonprofit group. EQUIP, which will hold its first ILHS meeting this week, is for individuals with disabilities ages 13 through 28.
    “People with disabilities are often severely underestimated…,” Trumpower said. “That is not fair.”

  • Rain gardens combat floods, erosion, handle storm runoff

    CLEMSON – The Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service and Carolina Clear have launched an initiative to help property owners install rain gardens to mitigate potential flood damage and help protect S.C. water quality.

  • Remember When: One last Main Street stroll with Mr. Bill

    Editor’s note: When Bill Evans passed away in July, we had a few of his recent columns stockpiled, waiting to run. With his family’s permission, we have continued to publish them in his honor. Alas, this is the final one.

    Well sir, three or four of us local boys had just finished going over the latest newspapers over at the library and decided to sit a spell under the shade trees.
    Just over to one side was Lancaster’s main drag. All of us had grown up on that six or seven blocks of history.