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Today's News

  • Gregory's battles have benefited all of us

    On Nov. 4, voters will send either Mick Mulvaney or Mandy Powers Norell to the S.C. Senate 16 seat next year. That’s because the person who has held that seat for 16 years is giving it up.

    When Greg Gregory was elected to the Senate in 1992 he planned to serve only two terms. But after local legislators Jim Hodges and Billy Boan retired, Gregory decided to stay on to have seniority on the local delegation.

    But that’s not enough anymore to keep Gregory in the Senate.

  • Residents lose power in storms

    Nearly 430 Duke Energy customers lost power in Lancaster County on Wednesday evening as strong thunderstorms swept through the area.

    Most of the outages occurred in central Lancaster, Kershaw, Elgin and Tradesville, said Duke spokeswoman Paige Sheehan.

    Almost all customers had service back by early afternoon on Thursday, except for a "handful," she said.

    "We've basically restored everyone," she said.

    At about 1 p.m. on Thursday, only seven customers were out in Lancaster, with more than 1,400 out between the areas of the Carolinas where the major storms hit.

  • Sumner running for second term in City Council District 4

    Lancaster City Councilman Bill Sumner said he wants to continue serving the people of the district and the city by running for the District 4 seat again.

    He announced his intentions on Tuesday, two days after Tamara "Missy" Green announced she would be seeking the seat. Sumner is now finishing his first full term on council, after completing the unexpired term of the late Councilman Frank Harris in 2004.

    Sumner said he enjoys the responsibilities of the position and he wants to continue serving during an interesting time for the city.

  • Writer laments 'days of yore'

    Since the gas prices have gone so high, I see people on my street, Chesterfield Avenue, walking on the sidewalks more. There are more mothers pushing buggies, children riding bikes and playing along the street.

    It made me think of the days of yore. Years ago, when I was a kid, we played on the street in our neighborhood until the street lights came on and our mothers called us to come home.

    It seemed more like a neighborhood back then. We knew about everyone on our street.

  • Political newcomer runs for City Council District 4

    A Lancaster native and political newcomer is vying for the Lancaster City Council District 4 seat.

    Tamara "Missy" Green announced her candidacy on Sunday with a get-together at a home on Willow Lake Drive, land that has belonged to her family through the years.

    Green said she deeply cares about the community.

    "It brings me back to my roots," she said Sunday. "This district is truly dear to me."

    About 30 people turned out for the gathering, also attended by former City Councilwoman Linda Blackmon-Brace, who is running for the District 3 seat on council.

  • Carolina Motorsports Park hosts 24 hours of LeMons

    Carolina Motorsports Park in Kershaw will host the 24 hours of LeMons Saturday and Sunday.The 24 hours of LeMons is a race of cars valued at $500 or less.The race will run on the CMP’s short course, which is a mile course.“We think it will be entertaining,” said Carolina Motorsports Park track manager Brian Smith. “Each race car has a different theme and each is very interesting.“We want to try and boost spectators’ interest in the track and we feel this event will be one to see.

  • A.R. Rucker earns Red Carpet honor

    A.R. Rucker Middle School had quite a school term for 2007-08. The school, located in east Lancaster, had what might be hailed as a “blue-ribbon year.”

    The school captured its second Red Carpet award, honoring Rucker for its family-friendly environment.

    The school also won the traveling trophy as the top school fundraiser for the 2008 Relay for Life campaign, which aids in the ongoing fight against cancer.

    Rucker’s Red Carpet Award marked the second time since 2004 it has garnered recognition from the state Department of Education.

  • Humane Society needs volunteers who have heart full of compassion

    I recently visited the animal shelter. It was not a trip I was looking forward to, yet one I had to make. I went because as a member of the Humane Society it is now my job to list all pets in the shelter. We list them so we can give these little ones a small chance at life.

    The animal control officer on duty asked me to take a seat and said he would get me the list. He told me there would be more animals in the pens than were on the list. He was getting ready “to put them down,” the terminology used for killing them. It was a job he said he didn’t like.

  • Family pride shows at business

    Walk around Builders Supply and it's clear that the owners have altered the business with the times.

    Seven warehouses, a loading dock, a parking lot for company trucks, innovative "lumber trees" and an administration building coupled with a small retail business dot the 12-acre property, which has been situated in the heart of downtown Lancaster for 100 years.

    Strategically positioned next to the L&C Railway, the facility holds $3 million in inventory.

    A walk down the halls and around the conference room gives one a sense of family and legacy.

  • Kirk described as 'honest, fair'

    The plaques and awards that adorn the walls in James Kirk's home speak volumes about what he meant to Lancaster County.

    His daughter, Kathy Douglass, shed many tears Wednesday night while she read some of those accolades. The list is extensive.

    Kirk died Wednesday at age 92. He was a former Lancaster city councilman, a member of the Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce and the Lancaster Soil and Water Conservation District.