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Today's News

  • Oak trees will have to go to make way for courthouse

    A couple of natural landmarks on Main Street will have to be cut down to make way for the new Lancaster County Courthouse.

    Two large oak trees in the parking area of the old courthouse along Main Street are rotting from the top down, Lancaster County Administrator Steve Willis said. One of the tree’s roots is also causing a retaining wall along Main Street to bow out.

    A new courthouse is slated to be built next to the 180-year-old courthouse on the grounds, starting sometime next year.

  • Nearly 200 toys collected from two neighborhoods

    INDIAN LAND – The spirit of Christmas is alive and well in area neighborhoods.

    Legacy Park and BridgeMill in Indian Land hosted holiday parties and collected gifts for Toys for Tots on Dec. 6.

    Legacy Park’s Breakfast with Santa attendees donated 109 new, unwrapped toys for the Marine Corps Reserve’s annual toy drive. BridgeMill’s afternoon event added another 79. Both increased their donations from last year.

  • Burglars target homes near IL

    Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office officials are asking residents in Panhandle neighborhoods to watch out for suspected burglars wanted in York County.

    York County sheriff’s deputies are looking for Dominick Oneal Daise, 21, in connection with several burglaries in York County.

    According to the York County Sheriff’s Office, Daise is a suspect in a burglary in the Regent Park subdivision, which neighbors Indian Land.

    Daise has two unknown accomplices who go by the nicknames “Slim” and “Chuck.”

  • Reaching for the stars

    Creative sketches and unique color schemes make up the dozens of paper stars that will soon adorn the halls at Brooklyn Springs Elementary School.

    The students there have been asked to “shoot for the stars” – to consider their ultimate goals and transfer those dreams to paper.

    One fifth-grade class had their dreams all mapped out.

    Karla Lopez’s dream is for her two older siblings to be able to move from Mexico and live with her in the United States. She wants to “be a leader” and help immigrants get Social Security.

  • City employees recognized at breakfast

    More than 100 Lancaster city employees dined at the annual employee appreciation breakfast last week.

    It took over 450 eggs and 220 biscuits to feed the crowd that gathered at the First Baptist Church’s Family Life Center.

    The group included City Council members, public works employees and employees of both the police and fire departments.

    City Administrator Helen Sowell welcomed everyone to the celebration and thanked them for their service.

  • Police reports – Dec. 14, 2008

    According to Lancaster Police reports:

    – Anthony Lamar Belk, 20, 207 S. Market St., was charged Wednesday with possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine.

    Belk was arrested after he sold three crack rocks to an undercover officer, the report said.

    The officer initiated the sale as part of the police department’s crime suppression effort, the report said.

    – Leslie Nicole Foster, 38, 1503 Chandler Place, was charged Tuesday with possession of drug paraphernalia.

  • Schools, colleges face more budget cuts

    Local school officials are preparing to deal with yet another round of funding cuts. This time, the cut is much larger than many had expected.

    On Thursday, the S.C. Budget and Control Board decided to cut state expenditures by 7 percent. The same percent has been passed on to all state agencies, which includes public schools and higher education.

    School district

    Lancaster County School District finance director Tony Walker said Friday that the state Department of Education has yet to determine how much local districts will be asked to trim.

  • Volunteers add trees to AJ State Park

    There may be even more reason to celebrate Arbor Day in Lancaster County, as trees come down in the Panhandle to make room for homes, shopping malls and medical offices.

    But trees are safe at Andrew Jackson State Park, where an Arbor Day celebration was held Dec. 7.

    Members of various Lancaster County garden clubs planted blueberry bushes and apple trees in the orchard at the park in honor of the day.

  • Top Dog

    The yard outside the L&C Railway can be a loud place.

    Between the roar of locomotives and boxcars coming and going down the tracks starting and stopping, to the railroad’s restoration workers grinding and welding on luxury train cars, it can be downright deafening.

    “It better be noisy,” said Bob Willetts, the former Hartsville arts teacher who now manages L&C passenger car shop. “If it’s not loud, nothing is going on and we’re in trouble.”

  • Bowie twins remind me of long-ago adventures

    Unexpected gifts are still the ones we cherish most.

    My granddaughter and her family have been spending a few days with us prior to Christmas.

    Because of circumstances, not everyone celebrates Christmas on Dec. 25.

    Two packages – wrapped by inexperienced Christmas elves – came with them.

    The presents were sent by the Bowie twins, age 8.

    They have taken a shining to me and already want to know when Pop (that’s me) can come back to Maryland.