Today's News

  • Mother, son share story of teenage alcoholism

    Cold sweats, shakes and restless nights were normal for Toren Volkmann. Total memory lapses were common in his life. 

    Alcohol controlled his life for years.

    Volkmann, a Washington state native, started drinking in middle school and soon turned into an alcoholic. After years of binge drinking, sickness and a host of unfavorable consequences, he turned his life around.

    Now he and his mother, Chris, travel the country telling their story of struggle, confusion, hope and perseverance.

  • Sanders, Penuel join USCL faculty

    Alexis Sanders is adjusting to life in the South, while Dr. Suzanne Penuel looks to become even more active in the local community.

    Sanders and Penuel are the two newest full-time faculty members at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster. The Lancaster News caught up with both of them recently to see how things have been going so far this semester.

    Alexis Sanders  

  • Fann's home to be dedicated today

    VAN WYCK – A little more than four months after a Van Wyck resident found herself homeless, there will be a celebration for the arrival of her new home.

    A new Spirit model mobile home from Clayton Homes of Lancaster rolled onto Rosemary Fann’s rented property in late October, just months after she lost her previous home and was almost forced to live in a tent in her front yard.

    Fann was taken in by her pastor, Jon Morgan, and his wife, Kristine, of Christ Fellowship Community Church, who then helped spearhead several fundraisers for her.

  • Teens sharpen their oratorical skills

    INDIAN LAND – The fifth-annual Oratorical Expose, sponsored by the Lancaster District of the AME Zion Church, took place Sept. 24 at El Bethel AME Zion Church in Indian Land.

    The event, held each fall, gives local teens a chance to sharpen their public-speaking skills.

    Nearly 20 teens competed in this year’s contest.

    Each of the 25 churches in the district was asked to spearhead a training forum and pick a student to represent the church.

  • Humane Society to dedicate sign Saturday at ceremony

    The Humane Society of Lancaster SC has raised money for a new sign for the Lancaster County Animal Shelter in hopes of raising the visibility of the shelter off Lynwood Drive.

    “Not too many people even know that we have a county-run animal shelter, or if they do, they are not sure of exactly where it is,” said Humane Society president Mary Reimers. “The street sign erected by  the S.C. Department of Transportation is woefully lacking as to size and content.”

  • Beckham is top new teacher

    Josh Beckham, a second-year teacher at South Middle School, says the classroom is where he belongs.

    Beckham worked for Founders Federal Credit Union as a sales representative after graduating college. Though the job allowed him to travel and meet people daily, he said he knew God was steering him in another direction.

    So the Lancaster native started an alternative certification and began teaching history at South Middle last year. His first year went so well, the Lancaster County School District honored him in a big way.

  • Boo Fun Fest promises good, safe Halloween tricks, treats

    A fun Halloween event for children is coming along as planned, though organizers say they still need more volunteers.

    The Boo Fun Fest, now a function of See Lancaster SC, gives area youth a Halloween alternative to going door-to-door trick-or-treating.

    The event, from 5 to 7 p.m. Oct. 31, will be held on the City Hall parking lot that faces the Springs House. Activities include a trackless train, various games and opportunities for the children to collect candy in a controlled environment without the potential risks of trick-or-treating door-to-door.

  • Initiative brings biomedical course to ILHS

    INDIAN LAND – A person is on the ground dead, and it’s your job to figure out how long the body has been there and what lead to the death.

    What are all the parts of the digestive system and what should you be aware of when treating a diabetic patient?

    The answers to those inquiries and more are being unraveled this semester in Jill Haun’s classroom at Indian Land High School.

  • City awards $685,000 construction project

    The city of Lancaster is moving forward in its efforts to upgrade its solid waste transfer station.

    City Council voted unanimously Oct. 13 to award the bid for the project to Loveless Commercial Contracting Inc. for $685,662.

    Council also decided to pay $35,750 to W.K. Dickson for administration and part-time oversight of the project.

    The total cost of the project is estimated at $925,000. That cost includes a contingency, which was recommended by city finance director Jim Wilson.

    In other business:

  • Teacher to bring history to life with $2,000 grant

    A local educator has been recognized with a national award for bringing innovative ideas to the classroom.

    Hope Figuero, a fourth-grade teacher at Erwin Elementary School, is one of 100 winners of the 2009 Unsung Heroes award program sponsored by financial institution ING.

    ING recognized those teachers for developing innovative programs and incorporating them into lessons.

    Figuero, who also received a $2,000 grant, was presented her award earlier this month.