Today's News

  • Saving old jail is important to county

    There has been much discussion about saving Lancaster’s historic jail. There are those who think it is not worth saving for a number of reasons. Probably the prime reason for some is the repair costs.

    Other reasons include a lack of understanding of the significance of the jail. Therefore, there is no appreciation for its history nor the noted architect who designed it.

  • Tomatoes get their day in court

    Some legal matters are so important that they make it before the U.S. Supreme Court.

    In 1893, one of the greatest legal cases of all time was put to rest when Chief Justice Melville Fuller and associate judges Stephen Field, John Harlan, Horace Gray, Samuel Blatchford, David Brewer, Henry Brown, George Shiras Jr. and Howell Jackson unanimously ruled that a tomato was indeed a vegetable and not a fruit.

    No, this is not some gag.  The case – Nix v. Hedden – addressed whether a tomato was classified as a fruit or vegetable.

  • Writer offers history lessons to Ostram

    I am writing this response to Robert Ostram’s letter, “Don’t bother saving old jail.” Ostram wrote, “The editorial mentioned Robert Mills, the architect who designed the jail. I have never heard of him. Now, if he was Frank Lloyd Wright, that would be different.”

    Please allow me to enlighten Mr. Ostram. Robert Mills (Aug. 12, 1781 – March 3, 1855) is sometimes called the first native born American to become a professional architect. Charles Bulfinch perhaps has a clearer claim to this honor.

  • Historic jail should be preserved

    This letter is in response to the gentleman who has the opinion that the historic Lancaster County jail is not worth saving. He seemed to take great pride in knowing about the great architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, but admitted not knowing anything about another great architect, Robert Mills, who was born almost 100 years before Wright.

  • House speaker should rise above partisanship

    South Carolinians have a right to know the answer to this question from the candidates in the 5th Congressional District: “If elected in November, whom will you support as the next speaker of the House?”

    Considering the divisiveness and partisan struggles currently running through Congress, it’s crucial to know where congressional candidates stand on this important issue.

  • Downtown park gets a rosy name

    A park formerly known as the vacant lot where the former Belk building stood on Main Street finally has a name.

    Teresa Meeks, director of support services for the city of Lancaster, and Jimola Wade, marketing coordinator of See Lancaster SC, the city’s marketing arm, addressed City Council on Tuesday night.

  • Libraries serving more with less funds

    It’s not something Michelle Hammond likes to think about.

    Hammond has been making good use of the Lancaster County Library this summer. Her children, Emma and Abby, both 11, and Alex, 2, enjoy checking out their favorite books. But when she hears about further cuts to the county’s library system, she shakes her head.

    “They love to read, so we’d hate to see anything else go,” she said.

  • Council closer to adopting capital improvement list

    Developing business parks, upgrading rail access and enhancing road options are all projects county officials want to include on its annual list of improvement projects.

    County Council recently reviewed its annual capital improvement list, a wishlist of county improvement projects requested by the Catawba Regional Council of Governments. The list, which needs to be adopted by Aug. 15, is part of a planning process developed by the federal Economic Development Administration. It can help provide the county with funding for a variety of projects.

  • Valuable lessons were learned from oil spill

    When Jed Clampett was shooting at some food and some crude came gushing out of the ground instead, he achieved by accident what almost all Americans dream of – instant wealth.

    Often Jed, the patriarch of the 1960s show “The Beverly Hillbillies,” showed the sophisticated city slickers that he was the one with true wisdom – a wisdom that comes from living, not from a fancy college degree or from reading The Wall Street Journal every day or working in a high-rise office building.

  • Fugitive turns himself in

    A Mississippi man wanted for vehicular manslaughter was tracked down in Heath Springs on Thursday.

    Zachary Aaron Goude, 19, was arrested Thursday near Heath Springs Town Hall after a search conducted by the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office.

    According to a sheriff’s office incident report, deputies learned Thursday that Goude was wanted by police in Byhalia, Miss., on charges of vehicular manslaughter by negligent driving under the influence. He was believed to be somewhere in Lancaster County.