Today's News

  • Historic jail should be preserved

    This letter is in response to the gentleman who has the opinion that the historic Lancaster County jail is not worth saving. He seemed to take great pride in knowing about the great architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, but admitted not knowing anything about another great architect, Robert Mills, who was born almost 100 years before Wright.

  • House speaker should rise above partisanship

    South Carolinians have a right to know the answer to this question from the candidates in the 5th Congressional District: “If elected in November, whom will you support as the next speaker of the House?”

    Considering the divisiveness and partisan struggles currently running through Congress, it’s crucial to know where congressional candidates stand on this important issue.

  • Downtown park gets a rosy name

    A park formerly known as the vacant lot where the former Belk building stood on Main Street finally has a name.

    Teresa Meeks, director of support services for the city of Lancaster, and Jimola Wade, marketing coordinator of See Lancaster SC, the city’s marketing arm, addressed City Council on Tuesday night.

  • Libraries serving more with less funds

    It’s not something Michelle Hammond likes to think about.

    Hammond has been making good use of the Lancaster County Library this summer. Her children, Emma and Abby, both 11, and Alex, 2, enjoy checking out their favorite books. But when she hears about further cuts to the county’s library system, she shakes her head.

    “They love to read, so we’d hate to see anything else go,” she said.

  • Council closer to adopting capital improvement list

    Developing business parks, upgrading rail access and enhancing road options are all projects county officials want to include on its annual list of improvement projects.

    County Council recently reviewed its annual capital improvement list, a wishlist of county improvement projects requested by the Catawba Regional Council of Governments. The list, which needs to be adopted by Aug. 15, is part of a planning process developed by the federal Economic Development Administration. It can help provide the county with funding for a variety of projects.

  • Valuable lessons were learned from oil spill

    When Jed Clampett was shooting at some food and some crude came gushing out of the ground instead, he achieved by accident what almost all Americans dream of – instant wealth.

    Often Jed, the patriarch of the 1960s show “The Beverly Hillbillies,” showed the sophisticated city slickers that he was the one with true wisdom – a wisdom that comes from living, not from a fancy college degree or from reading The Wall Street Journal every day or working in a high-rise office building.

  • Fugitive turns himself in

    A Mississippi man wanted for vehicular manslaughter was tracked down in Heath Springs on Thursday.

    Zachary Aaron Goude, 19, was arrested Thursday near Heath Springs Town Hall after a search conducted by the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office.

    According to a sheriff’s office incident report, deputies learned Thursday that Goude was wanted by police in Byhalia, Miss., on charges of vehicular manslaughter by negligent driving under the influence. He was believed to be somewhere in Lancaster County.

  • Ms. Brenda a great asset to library

    I am writing to express my appreciation of Brenda Parker, the children’s librarian at the Lancaster Library.

    My grandchildren started coming to the library for Teddy Bear Time in 2005 when they were 3 and almost 2 years old. They were introduced to music, stories and educational games. They sang and heard stories using puppets.

    They experienced Rhyme Time and were introduced to picking up and putting away using song as a way of encouragement.

  • Morin settling in as Habitat’s new director

    Joyce Morin has enjoyed getting to know the community since beginning work at Habitat for Humanity of Lancaster County.

    Morin was hired in May as the group’s new executive director. She succeeded Tracy Carnes, who resigned in February.

    Habitat for Humanity pools community resources to build houses for local residents in need. Morin said this post gives her the chance to further her aim of serving others.

    “The opportunity to be of help to the community and of help to the people is what I like best,” she said.

  • Mosey on down to cowboy church

    Mention the words “cowboy church” to someone and the usual response is a puzzled look on their face and the question, “What is that?”

    Carolinas Cowboy Church was started by two men, Pastor Jack Nunn and Ben Snipes. Snipes describes it as a place where people can come and see that you can be a Christian and still have a good time.  

    “Look around and you can see the friendship and fellowship among the people,” Nunn said. “There’s such a sweet spirit here.”